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Day 15: Dialogue September 15, 2010

Posted by garvoille in Homework.
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1. Review Literary Terms for Quiz tomorrow. Students filled out this study sheet: Literary Terms (L10). Then, they quizzed each other on the definitions of each word.

2. Progress Reports. All students got them, unless they signed out early or had an assignment that was missing that they wanted to fix. Please sign and return!

3. Dialogue. We learned how to punctuate dialogue. First, we took notes on a blank sheet of paper, W2. The heading should read “Punctuating Dialogue.”

Here are the notes:

dialogue: a conversation between two or more people

– start a new paragraph every time the person talking changes

– formula for dialogue:

The He said, and he said. in blue mark the beginning or end of dialogue. You do not always need to use these. The opening quote is always followed by a capital letter (that’s what the three lines mean) because the person speaking is starting their sentence. The closing quote always follows some form of punctuation, either a comma, period, exclamation point, or question mark. It must have punctuation inside the quote; it wants to hold that punctuation lovingly, wrapping its two little quotation arms around it. If there’s no punctuation, the quotation mark gets lonely.

4. Dialogue Challenge. Students rewrote this dialogue with correct punctuation and indentation:

oh Anita cried with fright has it really come to this she asked me yes I’m afraid it has, dear I muttered I love you do you she couldn’t look at me. I grabbed her face and yelled look at me please leave me she sputtered it’s over

Anita’s words are in italics. The guy’s words are in bold.

Here’s how it should look (ignore the spaces between lines; that’s just how the website works):

“Oh!” Anita cried with fright. “Has it really come to this?” she asked me.

“Yes, I’m afraid it has, dear.” I muttered, “I love you.”

“Do you?” She couldn’t look at me.

I grabbed her face and yelled, “Look at me!”

“Please leave me,” she sputtered. “It’s over.”

HW: If you wrote some dialogue in your inciting incident piece, your only homework is to correct the punctuation and indentation of that dialogue. If you didn’t write any dialogue, I need you to add a chunk of dialogue to your piece som

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