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September 28: A Day September 28, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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No Edline grades yet, folks. I’d like to grade more writing (there’s a lot!) and then send out an update on Sunday. Thanks for understanding!

1A

1. Freewrite for five minutes.

2. Story share. In order to get a better grasp on our memoir topics, we tried to tell the story out loud (with a beginning, middle, and end) in thirty seconds. We practiced this alone twice and with partners twice. Then we did a process write on how the experience of telling the story helped us clarify our ideas.

3. Vocab notes. We took notes on #3 and 4. If you were absent, you can view the notes here to copy onto V1: V1 words 4 and 5As we took notes, we determined the part of speech of each association word. We played Simon Says to review our word parts so far.

5. Notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). As we took notes, we watched some film clips to illustrate the techniques. On the back of L5, students filled out this Internal Monologue Practice sheet.

Internal monologue from Glee––watch 3:10-3:50. 

Metacognition or reflection from The Wonder Years––watch 0:45-3:25.

Flashback from Twilight-–watch the whole thing because it’s amazing.

Students could also pick up examples of these in writing if they wanted to.

HW: Choose one or more techniques from our notes today. Write a scene from your memoir that you planned out using the technique(s). It should be at least one page (handwritten is fine).

Absentees: Copy the vocab notes (V1 words 4 and 5onto V1 or get them from a friend. Print out or get from a friend the notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). If you want to print out the completed notes, check it out: 

Also, watch the videos linked above to clarify your understanding of these techniques. Finally, write one scene from your planned out memoir. It can be handwritten or typed.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Reading options for full-length memoir: A Walk in the Woods or Into Thin Air. We will start reading a full-length memoir in the next few weeks. Students get to decide which they would like to read, Into Thin Air or A Walk in the Woods. Both are excellent. However, because A Walk in the Woods isn’t on the county reading list, so you’ll need permission to read it. If you want to read it for class, have a parent or guardian sign this: Outside Reading Permission Form. You only need to do this if you want to read A Walk in the Woods. Additionally, if you’d like to read both for credit, you can do that, too. More on the independent advanced English projects later next week.

3. Reading about Nonfiction. As a class, we read the New York Times review of “The Lifespan of a Fact.” This review introduces students to the idea of conflict between responsibility to fact and interest in aesthetics.

4. Reading response. Then, after reading the article, students wrote in their notebooks a response to the prompt, “When is it acceptable to bend the truth in memoir?”

HW: None.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Pass in scene for homework. This will be graded but not extensively edited.

2. Reading options for full-length memoir: A Walk in the Woods or Into Thin Air. We will start reading a full-length memoir in the next few weeks. Students get to decide which they would like to read, Into Thin Air or A Walk in the Woods. Both are excellent. However, because A Walk in the Woods isn’t on the county reading list, so you’ll need permission to read it. If you want to read it for class, have a parent or guardian sign this: Outside Reading Permission Form. You only need to do this if you want to read A Walk in the Woods. Additionally, if you’d like to read both for credit, you can do that, too. More on the independent advanced English projects later next week.

4. Vocabulary notes. We took notes on #6 and #7 in the unit. We also learned the words condescending and disdain.

5. Two-minute writing prompt. What percentage of a memoir should be true? Students wrote this in their notebooks.

6. Reading “Memory and Imagination” by Patricia Hampel. We began reading this short memoir in class as a group and in pairs. As students listened to the first section, they underlined imagery. Then, as they finished reading, they summarized each paragraph in the margin of the reading in a phrase or two. It will be homework to finish reading the memoir and to finish summarizing in the margin. If you would like to work with one other person in our class to finish your homework, you may; however, you must read it and summarize it together, rather than having one person do the work and then copying it down. Also, you may only work with one other person in the class, so no more than two students should have the same summaries. I’ll always be very clear with you when it’s okay to work together on an assignment; in general, you can assume it’s not okay unless I explain how and when you can. Thanks!

HW: Finish reading and summarizing each paragraph in “Memory and Imagination.” ALSO, write one more scene from your memoir; it should be at least one page long (handwritten, one side OR double-spaced and typed), but you should write until you’re done telling the story of that scene.

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September 27: B Day September 27, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Freewrite for five minutes.

2. Story share. In order to get a better grasp on our memoir topics, we tried to tell the story out loud (with a beginning, middle, and end) in thirty seconds. We practiced this alone twice and with partners twice. Then we did a process write on how the experience of telling the story helped us clarify our ideas.

3. Vocab notes. We took notes on #3 and 4. If you were absent, you can view the notes here to copy onto V1: V1 words 4 and 5As we took notes, we determined the part of speech of each association word. We played Simon Says to review our word parts so far.

5. Notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). As we took notes, we watched some film clips to illustrate the techniques. On the back of L5, students filled out this Internal Monologue Practice sheet.

Internal monologue from Glee––watch 3:10-3:50. 

Metacognition or reflection from The Wonder Years––watch 0:45-3:25.

Flashback from Twilight-–watch the whole thing because it’s amazing.

Students could also pick up examples of these in writing if they wanted to.

HW: Choose one or more techniques from our notes today. Write a scene from your memoir that you planned out using the technique(s). It should be at least one page (handwritten is fine).

Absentees: Copy the vocab notes (V1 words 4 and 5onto V1 or get them from a friend. Print out or get from a friend the notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). If you want to print out the completed notes, check it out:

Also, watch the videos linked above to clarify your understanding of these techniques. Finally, write one scene from your planned out memoir. It can be handwritten or typed.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Finish notes on L5. If you were absent, you can get the notes from a friend or copy them from above (end of 1B entry). We watched this sweet morsel of cinema genius to illustrate flashback:

3. Writing time. Students chose one (or more) writing technique(s) and one scene from their memoir to write. We started writing the scene in class.

HW: Finish writing one scene from your memoir. It does not have to be the first scene. You should use at least one of the writing techniques we took notes on in your piece. The scene should be minimum, one page, but you should write until it is finished (in other words, it may be one page, it may be five).

If you were absent, get the notes on L5 from the end of the 1B entry above. Then, write one scene from your memoir using one or more of the techniques in the notes.

4B

1. Freewrite for five minutes.

2. Story share. In order to get a better grasp on our memoir topics, we tried to tell the story out loud (with a beginning, middle, and end) in thirty seconds. We practiced this alone twice and with partners twice. Then we did a process write on how the experience of telling the story helped us clarify our ideas.

3. Reading options for full-length memoir: A Walk in the Woods or Into Thin Air. We will start reading a full-length memoir in the next few weeks. Students get to decide which they would like to read, Into Thin Air or A Walk in the Woods. Both are excellent. However, because A Walk in the Woods isn’t on the county reading list, so you’ll need permission to read it. If you want to read it for class, have a parent or guardian sign this: Outside Reading Permission Form. You only need to do this if you want to read A Walk in the Woods.

4. Reading quiz on memoir homework.

5. Vocab notes. We took notes on #3 and 4. If you were absent, you can view the notes here to copy onto V1: V1 words 4 and 5As we took notes, we determined the part of speech of each association word.

6. Notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). As we took notes, we watched some film clips to illustrate the techniques. On the back of L5, students filled out this Internal Monologue Practice sheet.

Internal monologue from Glee––watch 3:10-3:50. 

Metacognition or reflection from The Wonder Years––watch 0:45-3:25.

Flashback from Twilight–watch the whole thing because it’s amazing.

Students could also pick up examples of these in writing if they wanted to.

HW: Choose one or more techniques from our notes today. Write a scene from your memoir that you planned out using the technique(s). A scene should be one part of the plot diagram or one column of the boxes. It should be at least one page (handwritten is fine), but you should write until you’re done telling the story. Due Monday

Absentees: Set up a time with Ms. Garvoille at lunch to make up your reading quiz. Copy the vocab notes (V1 words 4 and 5onto V1 or get them from a friend. Print out or get from a friend the notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). Complete this practice on Internal Monologue: Internal Monologue Practice. If you want to print out the completed notes, check it out: 

Also, watch the videos linked above to clarify your understanding of these techniques. Finally, do the homework, which will be due on Monday.

September 26: A Day September 26, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Turn in revision. Students passed in their work. Any students who did not have their printed revision today will receive a late grade deduction unless the computer malfunction or printer explosion is explained by a note from the parent.

3. Vocabulary notes! Students received new vocab notes on the first three word parts in Lesson 1 of our vocabulary on V1Vocab Unit 1 Guided Notes with SAT words. If you were absent, download this set of notes: V1 day 1 Vocab Unit 1 Guided with SAT. Students also received a Cheat Sheet for identifying parts of speech, which we did as we learned new words: V 0.5 Identifying Parts of Speech Cheat Sheet

4. Memoir examples. Students picked one of many freshman memoirs to read. These are all real student writing from previous years that were published. We read these memoirs for fifteen minutes, writing down a summary in the margin of what happened every 1/2 pages (two summaries per page). These are examples of what we will be writing ourselves.

5. Planning memoir. Students received this planning sheet to help them decide what to write their longer memoir about. Ms. Garvoille did an example for the class. All students should finish this for Thursday: My Plot Diagram/Planning Scene Selection Chart

HW: Finish  My Plot Diagram / Chart for Wednesday. Read and take summary notes on the example memoir you chose during class.

Absentees: Give your revised scene to Ms. Garvoille when you return. Download, print, and hole-punch vocab notes here: day 1 Vocab Unit 1 Guided with SAT. Download and complete My Plot Diagram. Here is an example of a completed packet:

2AB

1. Freewrite for five minutes.

2. Reading quiz on memoir to count as a homework grade since it was so short.

3. Vocabulary notes (only 2!). 

4. Notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5).

Here’s an example of internal monologue from Glee––watch 3:10-3:50.

Click here to watch the use of reflection or metacognition, with a very different voice-over, much more philosophizing, from The Wonder Years. Watch from 0:45 – 3:25

Notice how sure this narrator sounds in comparison to the insecurity of the Glee narrator?

We will continue these notes tomorrow.

HW: None. Savor it.

No one was absent.

4A

1. Freewrite for five minutes.

2. Reading quiz on memoir homework. 

3. Story share. In order to get a better grasp on our memoir topics, we tried to tell the story out loud (with a beginning, middle, and end) in thirty seconds. We practiced this alone twice and with partners twice. Then we did a process write on how the experience of telling the story helped us clarify our ideas.

4. Vocab notes. We took notes on #3 and 4. If you were absent, you can view the notes here to copy onto V1: V1 words 4 and 5As we took notes, we determined the part of speech of each association word.

5. Notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). As we took notes, we watched some film clips to illustrate the techniques.

Internal monologue from Glee––watch 3:10-3:50. 

Metacognition or reflection from The Wonder Years––watch 0:45-3:25.

Flashback from Twilight–watch the whole thing because it’s amazing.

Students could also pick up examples of these in writing if they wanted to.

HW: Choose one or more techniques from our notes today. Write a scene from your memoir that you planned out using the technique(s). A scene should be one part of the plot diagram or one column of the boxes. It should be at least one page (handwritten is fine), but you should write until you’re done telling the story.

Absentees: Set up a time with Ms. Garvoille at lunch to make up your reading quiz. Copy the vocab notes (V1 words 4 and 5onto V1 or get them from a friend. Print out or get from a friend the notes on Memoir Writing Techniques to Show (L5). If you want to print out the completed notes, check it out: Also, watch the videos linked above to clarify your understanding of these techniques. Finally, do the homework.

September 25: B Day September 25, 2012

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1B

1. Turn in revisions. Students who didn’t have their revisions printed out today need to turn them in ASAP! If you can’t find me in my office (211), ask the main office to put them in my mailbox. You can turn them in tomorrow, even though you won’t see me.

2. Vocabulary notes. Students took notes on Vocab word parts #1-3 on V1Vocab Unit 1 Guided Notes with SAT words. If you were absent, download this set of notes: V1 day 1 Vocab Unit 1 Guided with SAT. Students also received a Cheat Sheet for identifying parts of speech, which we did as we learned new words: V 0.5 Identifying Parts of Speech Cheat Sheet

3. Stones in the River. To plan their memoirs, students did this activity: Stones in the River. Here’s an example of a completed “river”:

This was completed in class. 

4. Memoir prewriting. Students created a sheet that looked like this: Planning Scene Selection Chart.

HW: Finish your Planning Scene Selection Chart for Thursday.

Absentees: Turn in your revised memoir piece to Ms. Garvoille asap. Download and print the vocabulary notes here to put in your binder (V1): day 1 Vocab Unit 1 Guided with SAT. Complete the Stones in the River activity on a piece of blank paper. Then, choose one of your ideas from your river to expand on in a memoir. Plan out the different scenes from your life that could tell that story using this sheet: Planning Scene Selection Chart.

2AB

1. Freewrite (3 minutes).

2. Story share. In order to get a better grasp on our memoir topics, we tried to tell the story out loud (with a beginning, middle, and end) in thirty seconds. We practiced this alone twice and with partners twice. Then we did a process write on how the experience of telling the story helped us clarify our ideas.

3. Vocabulary. We took notes on prefixes #4 and #5.

4. Reading example memoirs. For the rest of class, we read some examples of excellent student-written memoirs from previous years to get a stronger idea of how to separate our work into chapters, what kinds of different attitudes we can write with. Download the whole eBooks here!

HW: Finish reading the memoir you selected.

No one was absent.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Turn in revision. Students passed in their work. Any students who did not have their printed revision today will receive a late grade deduction unless the computer malfunction or printer explosion is explained by a note from the parent.

3. Editing practice. Students received W4 to help them practice copyediting marks: Copyediting Practice. We focused on “fluff” removal. Students spent about 3 minutes doing this.

4. Vocabulary notes! Students received vocab notes on the first three word parts in Lesson 1 of our vocabulary. If you were absent, download, print, and hole-punch the notes here: V1 first day notes (you will continue on notebook paper) and here: V2 first day notes.

5. Planning memoir. Students received this planning sheet to help them decide what to write their longer memoir about. Ms. Garvoille did an example for the class. All students should finish this for Thursday: My Plot Diagram/Planning Scene Selection Chart

6. Memoir examples. Students picked one of many freshman memoirs to read. These are all real student writing from previous years that were published. Students could spend the rest of the period either reading the example to help them know how to divide their memoir into chapters, or they could work on planning.

HW: Finish  My Plot Diagram / Chart for Wednesday. Read the example memoir you chose during class. There will be a short reading comprehension quiz on it just to make sure you are being given credit for the work you’re doing.

No one was absent.

September 24: A Day September 24, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Workshop Procedure. We talked through the workshop procedure outlined on W3: Memoir Workshop Guidelines. Students selected their core value and compared their value with their groups. Then, students watched videos of Ms. G’s former students doing step 1 (listening/reading). Finally, we modeled what steps 2-5 would look like as a whole class on Ms. Garvoille’s place piece (left).

3. Workshop groups. Students moved their desks into their workshop groups, chose one of the pieces (setting, character, or dialogue) to revise, and answered the pre-workshop questions on their Writer’s Workshop Checklist. Then, students read and listened, taking plus/delta notes as they listened and giving constructive commentary.

HW: Revise the piece you workshopped. Your revision should be very different from your rough draft. Do everything on the checklist you made in class. Bring in your revision on Wednesday with all of the drafts and your checklist. The revision should be typed and printed: 12-point, Times New Roman, 1″ margins, with an MLA-format header on the left. If you need more feedback email Ms. Garvoille and she will provide some: agarvoille@ycsd.york.va.us — please send an email instead of sending a message through Edline since Edline doesn’t provide your email address to me so I can’t respond!

Absentees: Choose one of the three pieces you wrote last week (or the one that you have with you at home). Revise one by reading it aloud to a parent, older sibling, or other adult. Have them follow the feedback procedures on W3. Then, revise (meaning add, change, delete, etc. in a major way) your writing. Type up the revision (see formatting requirements on the back of W3) and print it out for Wednesday. If you can’t get feedback from someone, email your rough draft to Ms. Garvoille and she will email you feedback.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Turn in revision. Students passed in their work. Any students who did not have their printed revision today will receive a late grade deduction unless the computer malfunction or printer explosion is explained by a note from the parent.

3. Vocabulary notes! Students received vocab notes on the first three word parts in Lesson 1 of our vocabulary. If you were absent, download, print, and hole-punch the notes here: V1 first day notes (you will continue on notebook paper) and here: V2 first day notes.

4. Planning memoir. Students received this planning sheet to help them decide what to write their longer memoir about. Ms. Garvoille did an example for the class. All students should finish this for tomorrow: M My Plot Diagram hon.

HW: Finish My Plot Diagram packet for tomorrow.

Absentees: Turn in your revision, rough draft, and checklist to Ms. Garvoille as soon as you get back to school. Download and print the vocabulary notes to put in the vocab section of your binder:  V1 first day notesV2 first day notes. Download and print My Plot Diagram. Follow the directions and fill it out a.s.a.p.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Turn in revision. Students passed in their work. Any students who did not have their printed revision today will receive a late grade deduction unless the computer malfunction or printer explosion is explained by a note from the parent.

3. Vocabulary notes! Students received vocab notes on the first three word parts in Lesson 1 of our vocabulary. If you were absent, download, print, and hole-punch the notes here: V1 first day notes (you will continue on notebook paper) and here: V2 first day notes.

4. Editing practice. Students received W4 to help them practice copyediting marks: Copyediting Practice. We focused on “fluff” removal. Students spent about 3 minutes doing this.

5. Planning memoir. Students received this planning sheet to help them decide what to write their longer memoir about. Ms. Garvoille did an example for the class. All students should finish this for Wednesday: M My Plot Diagram hon

6. Memoir examples. Students picked one of five freshman memoirs to read: “Curtain Call,” “The Thing About Being Mormon,” “Contrast,” “The Fruit of My Labors,” or “My First Best Friend.” These are all real student writing from previous years that were published. Students could spend the rest of the period either reading the example to help them know how to divide their memoir into chapters, or they could work on planning.

HW: Finish  My Plot Diagram / Chart for Wednesday. Read the example memoir you chose during class. There will be a short reading comprehension quiz on it just to make sure you are being given credit for the work you’re doing.

No one was absent.

September 21: B Day September 21, 2012

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1B

1. Freewrite. 5 minutes.

2. Return work. Students received their rough drafts back today with a check, check-plus, or check-minus. Check means you did the assignment and understood; check-plus means you understood the assignment on a deep level and pushed yourself; check-minus means you may not have completely mastered the material. These short writings were homework grades.

3. Copyediting marks. In preparation for our writer’s workshop, we learned the copyediting marks used by editors everywhere. Here they are on the internet! We took notes on these symbols on W2: Copyediting Marks using this powerpoint and the “smart” board (meaning the dry erase board with the projector):

 

4. Workshop Procedure. We talked through the workshop procedure outlined on W3: Memoir Workshop Guidelines. Students selected their core value and compared their value with their groups. Then, students watched videos of Ms. G’s former students doing step 1 (listening/reading). Finally, we modeled what steps 2-5 would look like as a whole class on Ms. Garvoille’s place piece (left).

5. Workshop groups. Students moved their desks into their workshop groups, chose one of the pieces (setting, character, or dialogue) to revise, and answered the pre-workshop questions on their Writer’s Workshop Checklist. Then, students read and listened, taking plus/delta notes as they listened and giving constructive commentary.

HW: Revise the piece you workshopped. Your revision should be verydifferent from your rough draft. Do everything on the checklist you made in class. Bring in your revision on Monday with all of the drafts and your checklist. The revision should be typed and printed: 12-point, Times New Roman, 1″ margins, with an MLA-format header on the left. If you need more feedback email Ms. Garvoille and she will provide some: agarvoille@york.ycsd.va.us

Absentees: Choose one of the three pieces you wrote this week (or the one that you have with you at home). Revise one by reading it aloud to a parent, older sibling, or other adult. Have them follow the feedback procedures on W3. Then, revise (meaning add, change, delete, etc. in a major way) your writing. Type up the revision (see formatting requirements on the back of W3) and print it out for Tuesday. If you can’t get feedback from someone, email your rough draft to Ms. Garvoille and she will email you feedback.

2AB

1. Freewrite! 3 minutes. We are getting much better at it!

2. Workshop groups. Students moved their desks into their workshop groups, chose one of the pieces (setting, character, or dialogue) to revise, and answered the pre-workshop questions on their Writer’s Workshop Checklist. Then, students read and listened, taking plus/delta notes as they listened and giving constructive commentary.

HW: Revise the piece you workshopped. Your revision should be verydifferent from your rough draft. Do everything on the checklist you made in class. Bring in your revision on Monday with all of the drafts and your checklist. The revision should be typed and printed: 12-point, Times New Roman, 1″ margins, with an MLA-format header on the left. If you need more feedback email Ms. Garvoille and she will provide some: agarvoille@york.ycsd.va.us

Absentees: Choose one of the three pieces you wrote this week (or the one that you have with you at home). Revise one by reading it aloud to a parent, older sibling, or other adult. Have them follow the feedback procedures on W3. Then, revise (meaning add, change, delete, etc. in a major way) your writing. Type up the revision (see formatting requirements on the back of W3) and print it out for Tuesday. If you can’t get feedback from someone, email your rough draft to Ms. Garvoille and she will email you feedback.

4B

1. Freewrite! 3 minutes.

2. Return work. Students received their rough drafts back today with a check, check-plus, or check-minus. Check means you did the assignment and understood; check-plus means you understood the assignment on a deep level and pushed yourself; check-minus means you may not have completely mastered the material. These short writings were homework grades.

3. Copyediting marks. In preparation for our writer’s workshop, we learned the copyediting marks used by editors everywhere. Here they are on the internet! We took notes on these symbols on W2: Copyediting Marks using this powerpoint and the “smart” board (meaning the dry erase board with the projector):

4. Workshop Procedure. We talked through the workshop procedure outlined on W3: Memoir Workshop Guidelines. Students selected their core value and compared their value with their groups. Then, students watched videos of Ms. G’s former students doing step 1 (listening/reading). Finally, we modeled what steps 2-5 would look like as a whole class on Ms. Garvoille’s place piece (left).

5. Workshop groups. Students moved their desks into their workshop groups, chose one of the pieces (setting, character, or dialogue) to revise, and answered the pre-workshop questions on their Writer’s Workshop Checklist. Then, students read and listened, taking plus/delta notes as they listened and giving constructive commentary.

HW: Revise the piece you workshopped. Your revision should be verydifferent from your rough draft. Do everything on the checklist you made in class. Bring in your revision on Monday with all of the drafts and your checklist. The revision should be typed and printed: 12-point, Times New Roman, 1″ margins, with an MLA-format header on the left. If you need more feedback email Ms. Garvoille and she will provide some: agarvoille@york.ycsd.va.us

Absentees: Choose one of the three pieces you wrote this week (or the one that you have with you at home). Revise one by reading it aloud to a parent, older sibling, or other adult. Have them follow the feedback procedures on W3. Then, revise (meaning add, change, delete, etc. in a major way) your writing. Type up the revision (see formatting requirements on the back of W3) and print it out for Tuesday. If you can’t get feedback from someone, email your rough draft to Ms. Garvoille and she will email you feedback.

September 20: A Day September 20, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite. 5 minutes.

2. Dialogue Punctuation. Students learned how to punctuate dialogue using whiteboards and this powerpoint: 

3. Dialogue practice. Students took the dialogue they wrote for homework and worked it into a longer piece of writing by adding description and action in between the lines. They also added dialogue tags.

4. JoAnn Beard’s “Behind the Screen.” We read together a short memoir (or really an “autobiographical short story”) by the wonderful author JoAnn Beard (who I met this summer!). You can read the first page of it here. As we read, we stopped to discuss the writer’s choices, the effect of dialogue on the story, and the significance of the title. This served as a model for students’ own memoirs.

5. Writing time. Students had fifteen minutes to continue revising the dialogue scene they wrote in class to make it longer or more specific.

HW: Finish dialogue scene we started in class for Monday.

2AB

1. Freewrite! 3 minutes. We are getting much better at it!

2. Return work. Students received their rough drafts back today with a check, check-plus, or check-minus. Check means you did the assignment and understood; check-plus means you understood the assignment on a deep level and pushed yourself; check-minus means you may not have completely mastered the material. These short writings were homework grades.

3. Copyediting marks. In preparation for our writer’s workshops tomorrow, we learned the copyediting marks used by editors everywhere. Here they are on the internet! We took notes on these symbols on W2: Copyediting Marks using this powerpoint and the “smart” board (meaning the dry erase board with the projector):

4. Workshop Procedure. We talked through the workshop procedure outlined on W3: Memoir Workshop Guidelines. Students selected their core value and compared their value with their groups. Then, students watched videos of Ms. G’s former students doing step 1 (listening/reading). Finally, we modeled what steps 2-5 would look like as a whole class on Ms. Garvoille’s place piece (left).

HW: None!

Tomorrow we will workshop!

4A

1. Freewrite! 3 minutes. We are getting much better at it!

2. Return work. Students received their rough drafts back today with a check, check-plus, or check-minus. Check means you did the assignment and understood; check-plus means you understood the assignment on a deep level and pushed yourself; check-minus means you may not have completely mastered the material. These short writings were homework grades.

3. Copyediting marks. In preparation for our writer’s workshops tomorrow, we learned the copyediting marks used by editors everywhere. Here they are on the internet! We took notes on these symbols on W2: Copyediting Marks using this powerpoint and the “smart” board (meaning the dry erase board with the projector):

4. Workshop Procedure. We talked through the workshop procedure outlined on W3: Memoir Workshop Guidelines. Students
selected their core value and compared their value with their groups. Then, students watched videos of Ms. G’s former students doing step 1 (listening/reading). Finally, we modeled what steps 2-5 would look like as a whole class on Ms. Garvoille’s place piece (left).

5. Workshop groups. Students moved their desks into their workshop groups, chose one of the pieces (setting, character, or dialogue) to revise, and answered the pre-workshop questions on their Writer’s Workshop Checklist. Then, students read and listened, taking plus/delta notes as they listened and giving constructive commentary.

HW: Revise the piece you workshopped. Your revision should be very different from your rough draft. Do everything on the checklist you made in class. Bring in your revision on Monday with all of the drafts and your checklist. The revision should be typed and printed: 12-point, Times New Roman, 1″ margins, with an MLA-format header on the left. If you need more feedback email Ms. Garvoille and she will provide some: agarvoille@york.ycsd.va.us

 

September 19: B Day September 19, 2012

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1B

1. Five-minute freewrite.

2. Dialogue rules. Students brainstormed what they knew about dialogue punctuation. They got a demo from Ms. Garvoille using her amazing dialogue cards. Here’s a good overview of the rules: http://theeditorsblog.net/2010/12/08/punctuation-in-dialogue/ Think you got it down? Test yo’self here!

3. Dialogue eavesdropping. At the end of class, we watched five minutes of the fifteen-minute film The Intimacy of Strangers by Eva Weber, featured at the Full Frame Documentary Film FestivalWatch some of it by clicking here! As we watched, we tried to write down as many fragments of conversation as we could hear. This exercise will help us write more realistic dialogue in our memoirs. We realized that many people repeat words, interrupt themselves, and use slang.

4. Dialogue practice. Now that we knew what kind of dialogue we might be working with, we started to apply the punctuation rules. Students challenged themselves by punctuating the following:

HW: Write a scene that may (meaning it doesn’t have to) appear in your memoir that includes both dialogue and description. 1 page minimum. Due Friday.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. JoAnn Beard’s “Behind the Screen.” We read together a short memoir (or really an “autobiographical short story”) by the wonderful author JoAnn Beard (who I met this summer!). You can read the first page of it here. As we read, we stopped to discuss the writer’s choices, the effect of dialogue on the story, and the significance of the title. This served as a model for students’ own memoirs.

HW: Write a scene that may (meaning it doesn’t have to) appear in your memoir that includes both dialogue and description. 1 page minimum. Due Thursday.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Characterization share. Students shared the best line or lines of their characterization homework with two other people in class; the two people then tried to guess the author’s attitude toward the character they were describing.

3. Dialogue rules. Students brainstormed what they knew about dialogue punctuation. They got a demo from Ms. Garvoille using her amazing dialogue cards. Here’s a good overview of the rules: http://theeditorsblog.net/2010/12/08/punctuation-in-dialogue/ Think you got it down? Test yo’self here!

4. Dialogue eavesdropping. We watched five minutes of the fifteen-minute film The Intimacy of Strangers by Eva Weber, featured at the Full Frame Documentary Film FestivalWatch some of it by clicking here! As we watched, we tried to write down as many fragments of conversation as we could hear. This exercise will help us write more realistic dialogue in our memoirs. We realized that many people repeat words, interrupt themselves, and use slang.

5. Dialogue practice. Now that we knew what kind of dialogue we might be working with, we started to apply the punctuation rules. Students challenged themselves by punctuating the following:

6. JoAnn Beard’s “Behind the Screen.” We read together a short memoir (or really an “autobiographical short story”) by the wonderful author JoAnn Beard (who I met this summer!). You can read the first page of it here. As we read, we stopped to discuss the writer’s choices, the effect of dialogue on the story, and the significance of the title. This served as a model for students’ own memoirs. 

HW: Write a scene that may (meaning it doesn’t have to) appear in your memoir that includes both dialogue and description. 1 page minimum. Due Friday.

On Friday we will work in groups to workshop either the setting, character description, or dialogue piece.

September 18: A Day September 18, 2012

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Hopefully, everyone is safe and sound back home, sheltered from the raging, tornado-warning weather! Here’s what we did today before the weather hit:

1A

1. Five-minute freewrite.

2. Characterization choice. Students got out L4: Characterization Prewriting. On that page, we wrote the name of a person who may appear in our memoir and our attitude toward or feelings about that person.

3. Characterization practice. Then, students looked at a slide showing four faces:

Students chose one face and chose one of the following attitudes: jealous, worried, caring, depressed. Then, students did a focused freewrite for five minutes describing the person’s face in order to reveal the writer’s attitude.

Example: (upper-left; jealous) Too-smooth, too-white skin stretches across arrestingly porcelain cheeks. Icy blue eyes look out over lids that seem to droop in condescension. Those garish red cheeks put on a good show, as do her blushing lips curved into a sinuous smile. She’s too perfectly blonde, like some unwanted child of Goldilocks.

or

(upper-left; caring) Her high cheekbones are beginning to show her to be a beauty, but she still holds her childishness. The warmed tip of an ear peeks out through tawny hair. Along her temples it curls ever-so-slightly. Deep blue pools shine out at me.

We shared our descriptions.

4. Characterization Prewriting. Returning to L4, students took the same approach to describing someone in their own life, first using the prewriting, and then moving onto notebook paper. Students should write one complete paragraph describing the face of this person in their life, using word choice to show their attitude toward the person. Due on Thursday.

5. Dialogue eavesdropping. At the end of class, we watched five minutes of the fifteen-minute film The Intimacy of Strangers by Eva Weber, featured at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. Watch some of it by clicking here! As we watched, we tried to write down as many fragments of conversation as we could hear. This exercise will help us write more realistic dialogue in our memoirs. We realized that many people repeat words, interrupt themselves, and use slang.

6. Dialogue writing. Students then tried to imagine a scene of dialogue that may occur in their memoirs. They wrote the script of the dialogue. (like this: Me: C’mon, Dad! Let’s –– let’s go!  Dad: Okay, okay. I’m just, just . . . etc.) This should be about 1/2 page long. We will add punctuation on Thursday.

HW: Finish writing your dialogue script and your description of a person’s face who may appear in your memoir (if you didn’t finish in class). For the description, use your prewriting sheet (L4) to help you. You must write this on a separate sheet of paper in complete sentences; it will be anywhere from 1/3 page long to a whole page. Longer is fine. Communicate your attitude about the character without directly telling us. Just use the description of the face to hint at the attitude.

2AB

1. Five-minute freewrite.

2. Characterization homework check. I walked around to check the work of about half the class. The rest of the students, whose work I didn’t check, turned in their characterization paragraph at the end of class.

3. Dialogue rules.Students brainstormed what they knew about dialogue punctuation. Here’s a good overview of the rules: http://theeditorsblog.net/2010/12/08/punctuation-in-dialogue/ Think you got it down? Test yo’self here!

4. Dialogue eavesdropping. We watched five minutes of the fifteen-minute film The Intimacy of Strangers by Eva Weber, featured at the Full Frame Documentary Film FestivalWatch some of it by clicking here! As we watched, we tried to write down as many fragments of conversation as we could hear. This exercise will help us write more realistic dialogue in our memoirs. We realized that many people repeat words, interrupt themselves, and use slang.

5. Dialogue practice. Now that we knew what kind of dialogue we might be working with, we started to apply the punctuation rules. Students challenged themselves by punctuating the following:

HW: None! 

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Characterization share. Students shared the best line or lines of their characterization homework with two other people in class; the two people then tried to guess the author’s attitude toward the character they were describing.

3. Dialogue rules. Students brainstormed what they knew about dialogue punctuation. They got a demo from Ms. Garvoille using her amazing dialogue cards. Here’s a good overview of the rules: http://theeditorsblog.net/2010/12/08/punctuation-in-dialogue/ Think you got it down? Test yo’self here!

4. Dialogue eavesdropping. We watched five minutes of the fifteen-minute film The Intimacy of Strangers by Eva Weber, featured at the Full Frame Documentary Film FestivalWatch some of it by clicking here! As we watched, we tried to write down as many fragments of conversation as we could hear. This exercise will help us write more realistic dialogue in our memoirs. We realized that many people repeat words, interrupt themselves, and use slang.

5. Dialogue practice. Now that we knew what kind of dialogue we might be working with, we started to apply the punctuation rules. Students challenged themselves by punctuating the following:

6. JoAnn Beard’s “Behind the Screen.” We read together a short memoir (or really an “autobiographical short story”) by the wonderful author JoAnn Beard (who I met this summer!). You can read the first page of it here. As we read, we stopped to discuss the writer’s choices, the effect of dialogue on the story, and the significance of the title. This served as a model for students’ own memoirs. 

HW: Write a scene that may (meaning it doesn’t have to) appear in your memoir that includes both dialogue and description. 1 page minimum. Due Thursday.

On Thursday we will work in groups to workshop either the setting, character description, or dialogue piece.

September 17: B Day September 17, 2012

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1B

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for five minutes.

2. Turn in setting writing. After the freewrite, students wrote on their setting piece due today what kind of group they would like to work in for writer workshops (same-level, mixed-level with higher students, mixed-level with lower students to act as a tutor). I collected the setting piece. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing for Wednesday. I’ll use these pieces as samples to place students in writing workshop groups.

3. Characterization notes. Students received L4: Indirect Characterization. We took notes on Dialogue, Action, and Description and discussed how to use each. Then, we looked at the example passages and discussed how the author used characterization to tell us more about the character than just physical descriptions.

4. Memoir brainstorming. Students will be writing full-length memoirs in class over the next few weeks––full-length means anywhere from four to six pages (or more!). They will choose one topic to focus on, either a particular time in their lives or a topic that has repeated itself numerous times throughout their lives. We spent a few minutes together coming up with ideas about what to write about in our own memoirs. Students wrote, discussed with partners, and listened to the whole class. We also passed around a book of memoirs written by Ms. Garvoille’s former students: Going on 15 or Other People + Me (click the links to get the eBooks!).

5. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion, either jealousy, caring, worry, or depression. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

6. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization). 

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due Monday. One paragraph minimum.

2AB

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for three minutes.

2. Memoir brainstorming. Students will be writing full-length memoirs in class over the next few weeks––full-length means anywhere from four to six pages (or more!). They will choose one topic to focus on, either a particular time in their lives or a topic that has repeated itself numerous times throughout their lives. We spent a few minutes together coming up with ideas about what to write about in our own memoirs. Students wrote, discussed with partners, and listened to the whole class. We also passed around a book of memoirs written by Ms. Garvoille’s former students: Going on 15 or Other People + Me (click the links to get the eBooks!).

3. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion, either jealousy, caring, worry, or depression. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

4. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization).

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due tomorrow. One paragraph minimum.

4B

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for three minutes.

2. Turn in setting writing. After the freewrite, students wrote on their setting piece due today what kind of group they would like to work in for writer workshops (same-level, mixed-level with higher students, mixed-level with lower students to act as a tutor). I collected the setting piece. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing for Wednesday. I’ll use these pieces as samples to place students in writing workshop groups.

3. Characterization notes. Students took notes and analyzed the way authors use indirect characterization on L4: Indirect Characterization / Characterization Prewriting.

4. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

5. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization). Students also had the opportunity to see numerous examples of descriptions of people vs. the person’s photograph in class with some passages from The New Yorker. Additionally, I read aloud a number of excellent student examples from previous years.

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due Wednesday. One paragraph minimum.