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September 14: A Day September 14, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for three minutes before we went to get our pictures taken.

2. School pictures.

3. Focused freewrite. Students wrote for five minutes to the prompt, “Imagine you are an adult looking back on school picture day. Describe it. Use imagery when possible.” We shared a sentence or two of these writings with the class using our share-out procedure.

4. Vocabulary notes. Students took notes on V1, their vocabulary notebook paper. Here are the five definitions of word stems we wrote down today:

1. ante: before

2. anti: against

3. bi: two

4. circum: around

5. com: together

5. Characterization notes. Students received L4: Indirect Characterization. We took notes on Dialogue, Action, and Description and discussed how to use each. Then, we looked at the example passages and discussed how the author used characterization to tell us more about the character than just physical descriptions.

In class, I collected the setting piece that students wrote for today. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing this weekend. I’ll use these pieces to place students in writing workshop groups.

HW: None. We will continue with character writing on Monday.

2AB

1. Pictures. We went to the auditorium for pictures, where students received their annotation grades from the summer assignment when finished looking beautiful for the camera. We discussed the summer assignment strengths and weaknesses briefly. If students wanted to take it home, they signed it out. We will keep all of our work in the classroom (unless you sign it out) just so we know where it is and we can keep track of our progress.

2. Focused freewrite. Back in the classroom, students wrote for five minutes to the prompt, “Imagine you are an adult looking back on school picture day. Describe it. Use imagery when possible.” We shared a sentence or two of these writings with the class using our share-out procedure.

3. Pass in summer assignments. 

4. Characterization notes. Students took notes and analyzed the way authors use indirect characterization on L4: Indirect Characterization.

5. Turn in setting writing. At the door, I collected the setting piece that students wrote for today. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing this weekend. I’ll use these pieces to place students in writing workshop groups.

HW: None.

4A

1. Pictures. We went to the auditorium for pictures first thing. We were the first class in and the first class back to learning!

2. Focused freewrite. Back in the classroom, students wrote for five minutes to the prompt, “Imagine you are an adult looking back on school picture day. Describe it. Use imagery when possible.” We shared a sentence or two of these writings with the class using our share-out procedure.

3. Characterization notes. Students took notes and analyzed the way authors use indirect characterization on L4: Indirect Characterization / Characterization Prewriting.

4. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

5. Turn in setting writing. As students worked, I collected the setting piece that students wrote for today. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing this weekend. I’ll use these pieces to place students in writing workshop groups.

6. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization). Students also had the opportunity to see numerous examples of descriptions of people vs. the person’s photograph in class with some passages from The New Yorker. Additionally, I read aloud a number of excellent student examples from previous years.

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due Monday. One paragraph minimum.

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