jump to navigation

September 17: B Day September 17, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
trackback

1B

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for five minutes.

2. Turn in setting writing. After the freewrite, students wrote on their setting piece due today what kind of group they would like to work in for writer workshops (same-level, mixed-level with higher students, mixed-level with lower students to act as a tutor). I collected the setting piece. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing for Wednesday. I’ll use these pieces as samples to place students in writing workshop groups.

3. Characterization notes. Students received L4: Indirect Characterization. We took notes on Dialogue, Action, and Description and discussed how to use each. Then, we looked at the example passages and discussed how the author used characterization to tell us more about the character than just physical descriptions.

4. Memoir brainstorming. Students will be writing full-length memoirs in class over the next few weeks––full-length means anywhere from four to six pages (or more!). They will choose one topic to focus on, either a particular time in their lives or a topic that has repeated itself numerous times throughout their lives. We spent a few minutes together coming up with ideas about what to write about in our own memoirs. Students wrote, discussed with partners, and listened to the whole class. We also passed around a book of memoirs written by Ms. Garvoille’s former students: Going on 15 or Other People + Me (click the links to get the eBooks!).

5. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion, either jealousy, caring, worry, or depression. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

6. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization). 

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due Monday. One paragraph minimum.

2AB

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for three minutes.

2. Memoir brainstorming. Students will be writing full-length memoirs in class over the next few weeks––full-length means anywhere from four to six pages (or more!). They will choose one topic to focus on, either a particular time in their lives or a topic that has repeated itself numerous times throughout their lives. We spent a few minutes together coming up with ideas about what to write about in our own memoirs. Students wrote, discussed with partners, and listened to the whole class. We also passed around a book of memoirs written by Ms. Garvoille’s former students: Going on 15 or Other People + Me (click the links to get the eBooks!).

3. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion, either jealousy, caring, worry, or depression. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

4. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization).

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due tomorrow. One paragraph minimum.

4B

1. Freewrite. Students wrote for three minutes.

2. Turn in setting writing. After the freewrite, students wrote on their setting piece due today what kind of group they would like to work in for writer workshops (same-level, mixed-level with higher students, mixed-level with lower students to act as a tutor). I collected the setting piece. If students didn’t finish the assignment, I recorded it on a pink slip (yes, they were pink-slipped!) and they will finish the writing for Wednesday. I’ll use these pieces as samples to place students in writing workshop groups.

3. Characterization notes. Students took notes and analyzed the way authors use indirect characterization on L4: Indirect Characterization / Characterization Prewriting.

4. Describing faces. Students chose one of the four faces here and, in their notebooks, described the face in order to show an emotion. We wrote for three minutes and listened to some volunteers share:

5. Character prewriting. Students chose one person in their life that may appear in a piece of creative nonfiction they write. They will write one paragraph describing this person’s fact in order to communicate not only how the character looks, but also how the student feels about that character. Students started by filling out the prewriting sheet, focusing on explaining how the details of a person’s face could communicate an attitude: Characterization Prewriting. Examples can be found on the front of L4 (Indirect Characterization). Students also had the opportunity to see numerous examples of descriptions of people vs. the person’s photograph in class with some passages from The New Yorker. Additionally, I read aloud a number of excellent student examples from previous years.

HW: Finish characterization prewriting (the face) focusing each detail on communicating your attitude toward the character. Then, on a separate sheet of paper or in your notebook, describe that person in complete sentences using your prewriting for help. Do not tell your reader what your attitude is directly. Due Wednesday. One paragraph minimum.

 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: