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October 1: B Day October 1, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Pass in homework. Students read example memoirs and labeled the use of reflection, flashback, and internal monologue. If you were absent, you should turn this in to Ms. Garvoille. Students who did not complete this need to finish it for next class for lower credit.

3. L5 notes. We finished taking notes on L5 on foreshadowing and narration. Here are the notes: 

4. Vocabulary notes. Students took notes on #6 and #7 as well as an SAT vocab word, disdain. Look here for the notes if you were absent.

5. Symbolism application. Students read “Storm Warnings” by Adrienne Rich to practice finding symbolism on L6. Here is L6 (both sides): Introduction to Symbol 1Introduction to Symbol 2. Then, students moved on to side 2 to practice the same strategy. Students recorded their ideas here: Moth symbolism chart

HW: Finish Moth symbolism chart for Wednesday. Extra credit: Write one more scene from your memoir.

Absentees: Copy down the notes to L5 and the vocabulary onto V1 in your binder. Download the Introduction to Symbol 1 and Introduction to Symbol 2Follow the directions on side 1. Write your answers on the paper in the margin on both sides. Then, fill out the Moth symbolism chart based on the reading on side 2.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Collection of permission slips to read A Walk in the Woods.

3. Symbolism application. Students read “Storm Warnings” by Adrienne Rich to practice finding symbolism on L6. Here is L6 (both sides): Introduction to Symbol 1Introduction to Symbol 2. Then, students moved on to side 2 to practice the same strategy. We discussed appropriate answers. Many students said that the storm or the moth symbolized things that were too literal; the storm can’t signify wind because it is wind. Also, the storm probably doesn’t symbolize night because those are both similar weather/outdoor phenomena. The moth likely doesn’t symbolize a wick or a flame because those are both too literal, and they’re both mentioned in the piece. Writers use symbolism to bring ideas or emotions into play through objects.

HW: None.

Absentees: No one was absent.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Collection of permission slips to read A Walk in the Woods.

3. Collection of homework (one more scene from your memoir).

4. Vocabulary notes. We took notes on #6 and #7 in the unit. We also learned the words condescending and disdain. Click here for the notes.

5. Truth in memoir. Students wrote for two minutes to the prompt, “What percentage of a memoir needs to be true? How much fiction is okay in a memoir?” We watched two clips of videos related to how much of a memoir needs to be 100% factually accurate. First we watched Michael Moore talk about his memoir Here Comes Trouble with Stephen Colbert (start at 3:24). Then, we watched an interview with James Frey, author of A Million Little PiecesHere are some segments of that interview with Larry King (watch it all). After watching, students wrote for one minute to this prompt: James Frey says he stands by the “essential truth” of his memoir, even though there were embellishments and difference. Students then put their name on a sticky note and placed themselves on a continuum of where a memoir belongs in veracity from “fiction” to “newspaper article,” from 0% truth to 100% truth. Here’s what we came up with:

6. Reading “Memory and Imagination” by Patricia Hampel. We began reading this short memoir in class as a group and in pairs. As students listened, they added annotations. To annotate well, write in the margin doing a variety of things:

Summarize each paragraph in a few words

Connections: make them between the text and your life, the videos we watched, or other texts you’ve read

Opinions: write your own down in the margin

Patterns in thoughts, images, or words that are repeated: note them by circling, underlining, and labeling

Exclamations: note your emotional reactions in the margins (ha! what!? no! YES!)

Then, as they finished reading, they summarized each paragraph in the margin of the reading in a phrase or two. It will be homework to finish reading the memoir and to finish summarizing in the margin. If you would like to work with one other person in our class to finish your homework, you may; however, you must read it and annotate it together, rather than having one person do the work and then copying it down. Also, you may only work with one or two other people in the class, so no more than three students should have the same summaries (but everyone should have slightly different annotations). I’ll always be very clear with you when it’s okay to work together on an assignment; in general, you can assume it’s not okay unless I explain how and when you can. Thanks!

7. Change your position on the continuum, if desired. At the end of class, students reevaluated their thoughts on what percentage of memoir should be true. Here is what we came up with:

HW: Finish reading and annotating “Memory and Imagination.”

Absentees: Bring Ms. Garvoille your permission slip and homework when you return. Copy down the vocabulary notes (see link above) onto V1 and V2. Watch the videos and do the writings in #5 on a separate sheet of paper. Download “Memory and Imagination,” print it out, and annotate it.

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