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October 3: B Day October 3, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Review of symbolism. We looked at our charts from homework and reviewed correct answers. I collected them for a grade.

3. Vocab review. We played a quick game of Simon Says.

4. Symbolism planning. I led students through a planning process for incorporating symbolism into their memoirs. First, we spent 4 minutes listing 15 objects or places that are central to their memoir. Then, students explained to their partners each of their objects or places in a minute and the partner told them which five seemed the most interesting. If you’re doing this alone, just pick the five that seem most interesting to you. Next, students picked three of those five and listed the characteristics of those objects in a small chart in their writer’s notebooks. Finally, students chose one of those three objects or places and, in a seven-minute focused freewrite, they explained how the object might be turned into a symbol. Hopefully, after this preparation most students had an idea and were ready to write their piece. Next, students chose a scene from their memoir that object appears in; we began writing that scene. When you get to the part in the scene that mentions the object or place, go into a detailed description that names the characteristics that relate to the symbolism.

HW: Write one scene from your memoir that includes a symbolic object or place. It should be at least one page long and include a symbolic description of the object or place.

Absentees: Turn in your chart to Ms. G. when you get back. Follow the directions for #4 at home.

2AB

1. Freewrite

2. Sharing symbolism writings. We all shared a few sentences from our symbolism writing from homework. Then we turned it in.

3. Reading “If You Are Lucky” by Susan Fox Rogers. We took a break from writing (since we’ve been working so hard!) to read today. We began reading this short memoir in class as a group and then read independently. As students listened and read silently, they added annotations. To annotate well, write in the margin doing a variety of things:

Summarize each paragraph in a few words

Connections: make them between the text and your life, the videos we watched, or other texts you’ve read

Opinions: write your own down in the margin

Patterns in thoughts, images, or words that are repeated: note them by circling, underlining, and labeling

Exclamations: note your emotional reactions in the margins (ha! what!? no! YES!)

This memoir effectively uses symbolism to address the death of the author’s mother. Here is a link to parts of that memoir on GoogleBooks: “If You Are Lucky” in My Reach: A Hudson River Memoir.

HW: Finish reading and annotating “If You Are Lucky” for tomorrow.

Absentees: I will post a temporary link to the reading later this afternoon. Print it out and annotate it for class tomorrow.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Vocab notes. We took notes on #8-10 in our vocabulary.

3. Symbolism application. Students read “Storm Warnings” by Adrienne Rich to practice finding symbolism on L6. Here is L6 (both sides): Introduction to Symbol 1Introduction to Symbol 2. Then, students moved on to side 2 to practice the same strategy.

4. Symbolism planning. I led students through a planning process for incorporating symbolism into their memoirs. First, we spent 4 minutes listing 15 objects or places that are central to their memoir. Then, students explained to their partners each of their objects or places in a minute and the partner told them which five seemed the most interesting. Next, students picked three of those five and listed the characteristics of those objects in a small chart in their writer’s notebooks. Finally, students chose one of those three objects or places that might be turned into a symbol. For two minutes they wrote about how that object might be symbolic. Hopefully, after this preparation most students had an idea and were ready to write their piece. You might directly discuss how the object is symbolic or, like Rich in “Storm Warnings,” or Virginia Woolf in the excerpt about the moth, you might not directly state the symbolism. It all depends on the voice you use in your memoir. 

HW: Write an entire scene from your memoir in which you use symbolism in part of it. In the symbolism section you should describe the object or place in depth, either directly or indirectly relating it to your intended meaning. Due Friday.

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