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November 30: A Day November 30, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Sentence Corrections. Students corrected run-on sentences in their writer’s notebooks to practice correct mechanics and grammar.

3. Tell the Truth. Students picked cards with the names of characters on them. After picking cards, students received this graphic organizer: Tell the truth. In small groups, students gathered to fill out the organizer, searching for quotes connected to character motivation and desires. Then, students returned to their desks to write in complete sentences, answering the questions in the boxes. Finally, students came up to the front of the class “in character.” As their character, they had to answer questions posed to them by a character judge. As a class, we voted on the most accurate version of each character.

4. Sustained Silent Reading. We read for about 15 minutes at the end of class.

HW: Read Chapter 5 AND Chapter 6, taking notes on your Outsiders Reading Guide as you go.

2AB

1. Freewrite and Field Trip form collection.

2. Oral Quiz on Chapter 4.

3. Tableau vivant. Students gathered in their motif groups to create two tableaux showing how their motif was especially important in chapters 3 and 4; the first tableau depicted a scene or moment the motif showed up and the second tableau could not use any characters––instead, students had to show what the novel is telling us about the importance of the motif. The students in the audience guessed at what the tableaux meant.

4. Preview of Chapter 5.

HW: Read Chapter 5 and continue taking motif notes.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Idea web on what’s important to you in life. Students came up with a bubble map and then three statements that represented what they believed most in life. Here’s one of mine: A good friendship is one that involves both deep, philosophical discussions and stupid jokes. Students were told we would return to this later.

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 5. This oral quiz was preceded by lots of great questions from students. Thank you! We had an awesome conversation about how Gollem refers to himself as “my precious” until the moment he realizes the ring is lost, at which point he shifts to using “my precious” for the ring as well, suggesting how intimately linked the ring is to his very identity. Cool.

4. Riddles and Humanity. Students learned briefly about the Riddle of the Sphinx and we discussed how riddles reveal much about the nature of man and the teller, since the answer to the sphinx’s riddle is “man, himself.” As a class we examined the first riddle closely, annotating it on the board and discussing:

IMG_0808

5. Next, students chose their own riddle to analyze and annotate: Riddles. This took about 15 minutes.

6. Finally, students wrote their own riddles based on the statements they came up with at the beginning of class. Here was mine:

It turns without warning
At the slightest laugh.
Its giggles and nodding
Alternate thoughtful and crass.
A mirror between them shows
Knees touching knees.
An electric feeling blows
‘tween lilting sounds, free.

(It’s a friendly conversation.)

HW: Read Chapter 6 of The Hobbit and continue taking your motif notes. The goblins will return!

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November 29: B Day November 29, 2012

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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused Freewrite. Students reread the section on p. 48 of The Outsiders in which Ponyboy describes how he wishes he lived in the country to get away from his problems. Students then wrote about what place they would go to to escape their problems. We used the same sentence structures as Ponyboy does in his paragraph. This took students five minutes. We shared a few out loud.

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 3 of The Outsiders

4. Sentence Corrections. Students corrected a few incorrectly worded run-ons.

5. Chapter 4 read-aloud. The rest of class we read Chapter 4 out loud, stopping to discuss alternate options for the characters as we did. We discussed what else Ponyboy and Johnny could have said to the Socs to avoid a fight and what Ponyboy and Johnny could do after Johnny makes his crucial mistake. Students will need to read the rest of Chapter 4 at home.

HW: Read the rest of Chapter 4.  Mark and explain five points in the chapter that relate to your motif. 

2AB

1. Freewrite

2. Focused freewrite: What’s your shire? I told students a story about how “the shire” made an appearance in my family. We then looked at the numerous times Bilbo thinks of his “hobbit hole.” Students then used imagery to describe their own shire or hobbit-hole, a place, time, or activity that makes them feel happy, safe, and free of responsibility, a place they can think of in difficult times to make them feel lazy and wonderful. This writing is done in an effort to get students to feel a connection to Bilbo, which sometimes seems difficult.

3. Vocab tests returned and field trip money and permission slips collected.

4. Oral Quiz on Chapter 3 of The Hobbit.

5. Runes and moon-letters. Bilbo Baggins loves “maps” and “runes and letters and cunning handwriting.” In an attempt to enjoy what Bilbo enjoys, we spend about 10 minutes learning to decipher runes, shown on the maps at the front of the novel; runes are actually real letters historically used before the Latin alphabet was adopted. (Did you know you can MAKE YOUR OWN RUNE MESSAGES WITH A RUNE-GENERATOR? Too cool.)

HW: Read Chapter 4 of The Hobbit and take your 5-10 motif notes.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite: What’s your shire? I told students a story about how “the shire” made an appearance in my family. We then looked at the numerous times Bilbo thinks of his “hobbit hole.” Students then used imagery to describe their own shire or hobbit-hole, a place, time, or activity that makes them feel happy, safe, and free of responsibility, a place they can think of in difficult times to make them feel lazy and wonderful. This writing is done in an effort to get students to feel a connection to Bilbo, which sometimes seems difficult.

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 3 and 4 of The Hobbit.

4. Tableau vivant. Students gathered in their motif groups to create two tableaux showing how their motif was especially important in chapters 3 and 4; the first tableau depicted a scene or moment the motif showed up and the second tableau could not use any characters––instead, students had to show what the novel is telling us about the importance of the motif. The students in the audience guessed at what the tableaux meant.

5. Reading Chapter 5 with a backchannel. We began reading Chapter 5, which students must read for homework. As we read, students noted their motif on a “backchannel” which in this case was a chatroom they had all joined and we projected onto the screen. Any time I read aloud something related to their motif, they typed into the chatroom what their motif was and how the line related. Students need to finish reading on their own for Monday.

HW: Read Chapter 5 and annotate your text for your motif.

November 28: A Day November 28, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused Freewrite. Students reread the section on p. 48 of The Outsiders in which Ponyboy describes how he wishes he lived in the country to get away from his problems. Students then wrote about what place they would go to to escape their problems. We used the same sentence structures as Ponyboy does in his paragraph. This took students five minutes. We shared a few out loud.

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 3 of The Outsiders

4. Sentence Corrections. Students corrected a few incorrectly worded fragments.

5. Chapter 4 read-aloud. The rest of class we read Chapter 4 out loud, stopping to discuss alternate options for the characters as we did. We discussed what else Ponyboy and Johnny could have said to the Socs to avoid a fight and what Ponyboy and Johnny could do after Johnny makes his crucial mistake. We read up until almost the end of the chapter, so students will need to read the last two pages of Chapter 4 at home.

HW: Read the last two pages of Chapter 4. (To Kill a Mockingbird, read to the end of Chapter 9.) Mark and explain five points in the chapter that relate to your motif. 

2AB

1. Study time for vocab test.

2. Vocabulary test — this took all period.

3. Field trip forms. Students will be attending a screening of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey by director Peter Jackson on December 14 (opening day!) to analyze the media’s take on this children’s story. This is an A Day. Students will be gone from 8:45-1:00, approximately. The field trip costs $7.50 and you must have your permission slip signed. Bring back the permission slip and $7.50 cash or check ASAP. Parents! Want to chaperone? I’dlove to have you! Let me know via email: agarvoille@ycsd.york.va.us Students were given a field trip form and a flier.

HW: Read Chapter 3 of The Hobbit and take your motif notes.

4A

One vision of the Shire.

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite: What’s your shire? I told students a story about how “the shire” made an appearance in my family. We then looked at the numerous times Bilbo thinks of his “hobbit hole.” Students then used imagery to describe their own shire or hobbit-hole, a place, time, or activity that makes them feel happy, safe, and free of responsibility, a place they can think of in difficult times to make them feel lazy and wonderful. This writing is done in an effort to get students to feel a connection to Bilbo, which sometimes seems difficult.

3. Sentence Corrections.

4. Oral Quiz on Chapter 3 of The Hobbit.

5. Runes and moon-letters. Bilbo Baggins loves “maps” and “runes and letters and cunning handwriting.” In an attempt to enjoy what Bilbo enjoys, we spend about 10 minutes learning to decipher runes, shown on the maps at the front of the novel; runes are actually real letters historically used before the Latin alphabet was adopted. (There is a message for you from Ms. Garvoille above. Did you know you can MAKE YOUR OWN RUNE MESSAGES WITH A RUNE-GENERATOR? Too cool.)

6. Oral Quiz on Chapter 4.

7. Tableau vivant. Students gathered in their motif groups to create a tableau of their bodies showing how their motif was especially important in chapters 3 and 4.

8. Reading Chapter 5 with a backchannel. We began reading Chapter 5, which students must read for homework. As we read, students noted their motif on a “backchannel” which in this case was a chatroom they had all joined and we projected onto the screen. Any time I read aloud something related to their motif, they typed into the chatroom what their motif was and how the line related. We read together through page 71. Students need to finish reading on their own for Friday.

HW: Read Chapter 5 and annotate your text for your motif.

November 27: B Day November 27, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite. For five minutes, students responded to the prompt, How does this motif show up in your life or the life of an American teenager today? Then, students met briefly with their groups to discuss their responses.

3. Oral quiz. We took an oral reading check quiz on chapter 2 of The Outsiders, which students had to read for homework over break.

4. Sentence corrections. Students corrected two incorrectly written fragments as a break between activities.

5. Finding motif in Chapters 1 and 2 of The Outsiders. Students worked with their motif groups to create a poster that displayed 4 quotes that demonstrated their motif and 4 explanations of the quotes, 1 symbolic image about the motif, and a hypothesis about what the novel is teaching its readers about the motif so far. Students then presented these to the class.

HW: Read Chapter 3 of The Outsiders. For each chapter you read, locate and explain five lines that relate to your motif. Due Thursday.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Simon Says vocabulary review. Our vocab test is tomorrow!

Test information:

Three sections

  • Section I: SAT words. You will be given the SAT words. You must use the word correctly in context in an original sentence.
  • Section II: Word part memorization. You will be given the word stems and you must write what the definition is. (I give you “a, an,” you write “without, lacking.”
  • Section III: Word part application, multiple choice. Students will apply the word stems to explain what new words using those stems mean.

Extra credit for…

  • Creating paper flashcards +2
  • Having all of your vocabulary notes +1
  • Scoring in the top 10 of our class on Quizlet’s Space Race or Scatter +2
  • Scoring #1 in our class on Space Race or Scatter +3
  • Writing three example sentences for each SAT word as practice +1

3. Focused Freewrite. Students had seven minutes to respond to this prompt: Describe a time you agreed to do something completely out of character and you were surprisingly successful. This is essentially what Bilbo Baggins will do throughout the story. When did you do this? We shared for 30 seconds with partners and then heard a few for the whole group. For one minute students wrote about how they were like Bilbo Baggins

4. Oral Quiz. Students answered five questions about Chapter 2 of The Hobbit.

5. Chapter 3 read-aloud. We began reading the beginning of Chapter 3, which students will need to read for Thursday.

HW: Study for vocabulary test tomorrow. Read Chapter 3 for Thursday. Take notes on at least 5 occurrences of your motif (quotes)  in the chapter. Explain why you chose each quote and how it relates to your motif. You can take these notes on stickies, in your book, or on notebook paper.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite. Students had seven minutes to respond to this prompt: Describe a time you agreed to do something completely out of character and you were surprisingly successful. This is essentially what Bilbo Baggins will do throughout the story. When did you do this? We shared for 30 seconds with partners and then heard a few for the whole group.

3. Field trip forms. Students will be attending a screening of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey by director Peter Jackson on December 14 (opening day!) to analyze the media’s take on this children’s story. This is an A Day. Students will be gone from 8:45-1:00, approximately. The field trip costs $7.50 and you must have your permission slip signed. Parents! Want to chaperone? I’d love to have you! Let me know via email: agarvoille@ycsd.york.va.us 

4. Oral Quiz. Students answered five questions about Chapter 2 of The Hobbit.

5. 3 Observations and 5 Whys. Students shared an observation about the reading with their partner (ex: Bilbo isn’t actually very good at burgling). We put three up on the board. For each observation, students answered the question Why? five times, either through a cold-call or by volunteering an answer. This helped us see that all parts of a text exist for some reason–to be entertaining, to make the protagonist look good, to tell the hero journey, etc.

6. Sentence corrections. Students corrected three run-on sentences and three students led the class in correcting them together.

7. Finding motif in Chapter 2. Students worked with their motif groups to create a poster that displayed 4 quotes that demonstrated their motif and 4 explanations of the quotes, 1 symbolic image about the motif, and a hypothesis about what the novel is teaching its readers about the motif so far. Students then presented these to the class.

HW: Read Chapters 3 and 4 of The Hobbit and take notes on at least 5 occurrences of your motif for each chapter (10 in all for Thursday).

November 26: A Day November 26, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Motif groups announced. Students found out which motif they will be tracking as they read The Outsiders.

3. Focused freewrite. For five minutes, students responded to the prompt, How does this motif show up in your life or the life of an American teenager today? Then, students met briefly with their groups to discuss their responses.

4. Motif notes. Students learned what is expected of them when they take notes as they read. For each chapter, students must use sticky notes to mark at least five lines that reference their motif. On the sticky note, the student should write at least one sentence explaining what the quote shows about their motif. If students don’t have sticky notes, they can write their notes on a piece of notebook paper. On the paper, they should include a passage from the book, an explanation of why they chose the passage, and the page number the passage was found on. There should be at least five entries for each chapter.

5. Oral quiz. We took an oral reading check quiz on chapter 2 of The Outsiders, which students had to read for homework over break.

6. Sentence corrections. Students corrected two incorrectly written fragments as a break between activities.

7. Finding motif in Chapters 1 and 2 of The Outsiders. Students worked with their motif groups to create a poster that displayed 4 quotes that demonstrated their motif and 4 explanations of the quotes, 1 symbolic image about the motif, and a hypothesis about what the novel is teaching its readers about the motif so far. Students then presented these to the class.

8. Read-aloud of the beginning of chapter 3.

HW: Finish reading Chapter 3 of The Outsiders or finish reading Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird (which two students are reading in addition to The Outsiders). For each chapter you read, locate and explain five lines that relate to your motif.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Questions about taking notes on motif.

3. Vocab review. We went to the computer lab to review our vocabulary words on Quizlet.

Test information:

Three sections

  • Section I: SAT words. You will be given the SAT words. You must use the word correctly in context in an original sentence.
  • Section II: Word part memorization. You will be given the word stems and you must write what the definition is. (I give you “a, an,” you write “without, lacking.”
  • Section III: Word part application, multiple choice. Students will apply the word stems to explain what new words using those stems mean.

Extra credit for…

  • Creating paper flashcards +2
  • Having all of your vocabulary notes +1
  • Scoring in the top 10 of our class on Quizlet’s Space Race or Scatter +2
  • Scoring #1 in our class on Space Race or Scatter +3
  • Writing three example sentences for each SAT word as practice +1

HW: Study for vocab test on Wednesday. Add to your motif annotations if needed for tomorrow. I will check motif notes tomorrow.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite. Students had seven minutes to respond to this prompt: Describe a time you agreed to do something completely out of character and you were surprisingly successful. This is essentially what Bilbo Baggins will do throughout the story. When did you do this? We shared for 30 seconds with partners and then heard a few for the whole group.

3. Oral Quiz. Students answered five questions about Chapter 2 of The Hobbit.

4. 2 Observations and 5 Whys. Students shared an observation about the reading with their partner (ex: Bilbo isn’t actually very good at burgling). We put three up on the board. For each observation, students answered the question Why? five times, either through a cold-call or by volunteering an answer. This helped us see that all parts of a text exist for some reason–to be entertaining, to make the protagonist look good, to tell the hero journey, etc.

5. Sentence corrections. Students corrected three run-on sentences and three students led the class in correcting them together.

6. Finding motif in Chapter 2. Students worked with their motif groups to create a poster that displayed 4 quotes that demonstrated their motif and 4 explanations of the quotes, 1 symbolic image about the motif, and a hypothesis about what the novel is teaching its readers about the motif so far. Students then presented these to the class.

7. We started reading Chapter 3 aloud together.

HW: Read Chapters 3 and 4 of The Hobbit and take notes on at least 5 occurrences of your motif for each chapter (10 in all for Wednesday).

November 20: A Day November 20, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Ponyboy’s choice. Students looked at page 5 of the novel and listed the events that occurred. They then shared their list with two partners to make it more accurate. Then, students made a list of five different actions Ponyboy could have taken. They shared with the class to create a list of ten options. Finally, students wrote for three minutes about whether Ponyboy’s action was the correct one to take.

3. Reading. We read to the end of Chapter 1.

4. RAFT. Students wrote one page in class by choosing a combination of the following (choose one from each column):

Role  Audience   Format Topic 
Ponyboy

Soda

A guidance councilor

Darry

the Socs

the Greasers

Darry 

Ponyboy

your future children

yourself

Journal entry

Letter

Poem 

Understanding

Ponyboy getting jumped

Expectations

the gang rivalry 

HW: Read Chapter 2 of The Outsiders. Keep notes on your reading log. Due Monday.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Skit rehearsal time.

3. Skit performance.

HW: None. Optional: Revise memoir for tomorrow. Print out new copy and bring back old copy.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Personality of narrator in The Hobbit. Students described the narrator’s “storyteller-like” qualities and we found evidence for that description.

3. Skits of Chapter 1. Students performed skits on five sections of chapter 1. These were very well done and entertaining!

4. Motif assignments.

As they read chapter 2 and all future chapters, students need to note 5-10 occasions (or more!) that their motif arises in each chapter. Along with noting the quotation or passage, students should provide commentary explaining how that quote connects to the motif.

Here are the motif groups:

Luck, Chance, and Fate: SL, JB, HH, EW

Wealth, Greed, and Treasure: AY, EP, RH, MT

Lying and Misguiding: JM, SS, DT, JA

Genealogy, Ancestry, and Family: HL, TB, LJ, GT

Nature and the Natural World: AS, JR, LB, TE

HW: Read Ch. 2 of The Hobbit and track your motif either on sticky notes, writing in your (personal copy of the) book, or on notebook paper.

November 16: A Day November 16, 2012

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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. 

3.

4. RAFT. 

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Skits. Students were divided into five groups. Each group was responsible for doing a skit summary of on section of Chapter 1. In their skit, the group had to convey the tone of the scene. They used class time to rehearse.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Chapter 1 skits. Students were divided into five groups. Each group was responsible for doing a skit summary of on section of Chapter 1. In their skit, the group had to convey the tone of the scene. They used class time to rehearse. Then, students took video of those skits and sent them to Ms. Garvoille.

HW: Revise memoir for Wednesday.

November 15: B Day November 15, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Finish reading and annotating article on Amy Winehouse. Students then turned this in.

3. The Outsiders reading guide. Students received a reading guide to help them keep plot and characters straight as we read.

4. Reading The OutsidersStudents read and listened to the novel, stopping to take notes on character and plot.

HW: Optional – Revise memoir for Wednesday, 11/21.

2AB

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Issue copies of The Hobbit.

HW: Read chapter 1 of The Hobbit and answer reading questions. Optional: Revise memoir for Wednesday 11/21.

November 14, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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The Outsiders Movie Trailer

The Outsiders Audio

The Outsiders Webquest

November 9: A Day November 9, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

Today we looked at fragments and run-ons.

1. Freewrite.

2. Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences. About thirty minutes today playing with clauses, forming them into simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences. It was totally fun.

If you’d like to play along at home, or if you were absent, here’s what to do:

1. Download the game pieces: flash fiction kinesthetic. There are two copies on this file to save paper, but you’ll only need one copy.

2. Watch the powerpoint and make your own sentences with the pieces. But your sentences must make sense!

3. Notes on Sentences. We took notes on fragments and run-ons. Here are the notes (G3):

Fragment: an incomplete sentence, missing either a subject or predicate (or both)

Run-on: a sentence that joins two independent clauses (aka complete sentences) without the proper punctuation/connectors. Two or more sentences punctuated like just one.

How to fix a run-on: 

  • Add a semicolon between the sentences
  • Add a period between the sentences
  • Add a comma and FANBOYS conjunction between the sentences
    • For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So

4. Review. We went to the computer lab and students played any of the games found at these links to practice. Reinforce these skills at home by practicing more:

* Fragments and Run-ons

FR1. http://www.quia.com/pop/37752.html

 

* Fragments

F1. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/fragments_quiz.htm

F2. http://www.chompchomp.com/frag01/frag01.htm

F3. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/fragments_add1.htm

F4. http://www.chompchomp.com/frag02/frag02.htm

F5. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/fragments_add2.htm

F6. http://www.chompchomp.com/frag03/frag03.htm

F7. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/fragments_add3.htm

F8. http://www.chompchomp.com/frag05/frag05.htm

F9. http://www.chompchomp.com/frag06/frag06.htm

F10. http://www.chompchomp.com/frag07/frag07.htm

 

* Run-ons

R1. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/quizzes/nova/nova4.htm

R2. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/quizzes/nova/nova3.htm

R3. http://www.chompchomp.com/csfs04/csfs04.htm

R4. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/quizzes/runons_quiz.htm

R5. http://www.chompchomp.com/csfs05/csfs05.01.htm

R6. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/run-ons_add1.htm

R7. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/run-ons_add2.htm

HW: None.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Rereading. We took two minutes to discuss the benefits of rereading literature in the face of many students having read The Hobbit, our next work of literature, at an earlier age.

3. Vocabulary notes. Students learned numbers 17, 18, 19, and 20, found here.

4. Heroes. We discussed the hero journey and students began thinking about the qualities of heroes they are familiar with using this chart: Heroes Brainstorming. Then, students wrote for five minutes about how their hero of choice overcomes or is held back by his or her weaknesses.

HW: None. Optional: If you want your own copy of The Hobbit, bring it on Tuesday!

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Studying for vocab test and extra credit dispersal. 

3. Vocab test!

4. Sign up to publish memoirs. Students signed their names if they wanted their memoir considered for publication.

5. Introduction to the Hero Journey Archetype. Students learned about the hero journey: Hero Journey Archetype (L9). Then, they applied stories they knew to the different parts of the hero journey using this: Applying Hero Journey Archetype (L9.5)

HW: None. Optional: If you want your own copy of The Hobbit, bring it on Tuesday!