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December 19: B Day December 19, 2012

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1B

We watched most of The Outsiders in class today. We will watch the last section after break!

HW: None. If you haven’t finished your motif notes, finish them over break. Find at least 5 passages that display your motif in each chapter with a short explanation of why you selected the quote.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral Quiz on Chapter 12.

3. Annotation on Dwarves. Students annotated and wrote an ACE-IT paragraph on the following passage: L12 dwarves analysis.

HW: Finish reading The Hobbit over break. You can do 2 motif annotations per chapter instead of 5, just to relieve the stress a bit!

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral Quiz on Chapter 12.

3. Film review annotation. We all annotated the film reviews we printed out from home. If you were absent, you should annotate a film review of The Hobbit you find on the internet. 

4. Film review structure. As a class, we figured out the structure of most film reviews.

5. Writing your own review! We wrote our own reviews in the computer lab using this sheet as a guide: Writing a Movie Review. If you were gone, you should write your own review at home. It should be about 1-2 pages, double-spaced. If you did not see the film, write a book review instead.

Great job today, everyone! The reviews are really entertaining!

At the end of class, all students turned in their notes from the field trip.

HW: Finish reading The Hobbit over break. You can do 2 motif annotations per chapter instead of 5, just to relieve the stress a bit!

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December 18: A Day December 18, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral Quiz on Chapter 12.

3. Watching The Outsiders. We watched most of the film and took notes on this viewing guide: outsiders viewing guide

HW: None.

2AB

1. Freewrite

2. Oral Quiz on Ch. 11.

3. Review of film. We watched a few clips of the film to refresh our memory.

4. Film comparison. Then, we filled out The Hobbit in Novel and Film and discussed the differences.

5. Finally, students wrote an ACE-IT paragraph on one of the differences. They used one of these two assertions:

In The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Jackson chooses to ________ because ________.

In The Hobbit: There and Back Again, J. R. R. Tolkien chooses to ________ because ________.

Here is an example paragraph:

In The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Jackson chooses to make Thorin a main character because he fits the audience’s mold of a tragic hero. When the Wargs have attacked and the dwarves are hanging from a pine tree over the cliff, Thorin runs off the tree to fight the Pale Orc. As he runs, opera music plays in the underscore and a close-up on his face shows anger in his eyes. Of course, Thorin is defeated in the moment. His drama (due to the music) and anger are characteristics of a tragic hero, someone whose flaw is an excess of pride. The addition of a tragic hero to the film makes the story more acceptable to mainstream audiences, who may not be able to understand how they can focus on a perfectly respectable hobbit for the whole film.

HW: Read Chapter 12 for tomorrow. Take motif notes.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral Quiz on Ch. 11 and 12.

3. Dwarves analysis. We did a short close reading and annotation of one passage: L13 dwarves analysis.

4. Film comparison. Then, we filled out L12: The Hobbit in Novel and Film and discussed the differences.

5. ACE-IT notes. Students received W5: ACEIT

6. Finally, students began writing an ACE-IT paragraph on one of the differences. They used one of these two assertions:

In The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Jackson chooses to ________ because ________.

In The Hobbit: There and Back Again, J. R. R. Tolkien chooses to ________ because ________.

Here is an example paragraph:

In The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Jackson chooses to make Thorin a main character because he fits the audience’s mold of a tragic hero. When the Wargs have attacked and the dwarves are hanging from a pine tree over the cliff, Thorin runs off the tree to fight the Pale Orc. As he runs, opera music plays in the underscore and a close-up on his face shows anger in his eyes. Of course, Thorin is defeated in the moment. His drama (due to the music) and anger are characteristics of a tragic hero, someone whose flaw is an excess of pride. The addition of a tragic hero to the film makes the story more acceptable to mainstream audiences, who may not be able to understand how they can focus on a perfectly respectable hobbit for the whole film.

Students turned in their notes from our field trip as they left.

HW: Finish ACE-IT paragraph using L12 and W5. Finish reading The Hobbit over break. You only need to take 2 motif notes for the rest of the chapters.

December 14: A Day December 14, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Finish film terminology notes.

3. Film comparisons. Students viewed four different versions of an adaptation of Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations. We took notes on their differences using this graphic organizer: Great Expectations graphic organizer. Here are three of the scenes:

#1. 1948, Dir. David Lean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A-MvsZ2QxwM

Start watching at 1:08:52 and stop at 1:11:40

#2. 1999, Dir. Julian Jarrold

start at 1:37

#3. is copyrighted. It’s the BBC version shown on Masterpiece Classics with Gillian Anderson as Mrs. Havisham.

#4. 2012, Dir. Mike Newell, Adaptation by David Nicholls

http://www.crushable.com/2012/09/03/entertainment/great-expectations-clip-ralph-fiennes-magwitch-jeremy-irvine-pip-952/

4. Watching The Outsiders. We had a bit of a technology snag for a few minutes, but we got to watch the film until Ponyboy and Johnny go to the empty lot.

HW: Catch up on your reading if needed.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Practice finding evidence for your assertion. Students worked in pairs to solve a puzzle that required them to match assertions with evidence from The Hobbit.

Then, we went on our field trip to The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. On the field trip, students were to start this Viewing Guide, which is HOMEWORK to complete: Hobbit Viewing Guide

HW: Finish reading Chapter 11 of The Hobbit for Monday. Complete 5 motif notes. Finish your viewing guide (except Sabrina. :)

4A

After the field trip, we discussed our thoughts on the film.

HW: Finish your viewing guide. Also, finish reading Chapter 12 for Tuesday.

December 13: B Day December 13, 2012

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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral quiz on Chapters 10 and 11.

3. ACE-IT paragraph writing. Students chose a few sentences from Chapter 10 or 11 to annotate on their own and write an analysis paragraph using the ACE-IT formula. Here is the sheet we used: outsiders motif writing.

4. Film terminology. In preparation for watching The Outsiders on Friday, we learned some of the following film terms: Film terminology blank

HW: Read the final chapter of The Outsiders.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. We finished filling out our Film Terminology sheets (L11). Here’s a blank copy: Film terminology blank

3. Filming a page of The Hobbit. Students opened up their books to page 17. After I read aloud the page, they worked with their partners to decide how they would want to film that scene in order to get the correct tone across. They storyboarded 4-6 shots of their scene.

4. We watched this scene in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. As students watched, they mentioned all the film techniques they saw. Click here to watch the scene. 

5. Film comparisons. Students viewed two different versions of an adaptation of Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations. Here are the two scenes:

#1

1948, Dir. David Lean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A-MvsZ2QxwM

Start watching at 1:08:52 and stop at 1:11:40

#2

2012, Dir. Mike Newell, Adaptation by David Nicholls

http://www.crushable.com/2012/09/03/entertainment/great-expectations-clip-ralph-fiennes-magwitch-jeremy-irvine-pip-952/

As they watched, they took notes on the differences here: Great Expectations graphic organizer

HW: Read Chapter 11 for Tuesday and do motif notes for Chapter 11.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Brief share-out about Hobbit film reviews.

3. Practice finding evidence for your assertion. Students worked in pairs to solve a puzzle that required them to match assertions with evidence from The Hobbit.

4. ACE-IT practice. Students received feedback on their last ACE-IT paragraphs and then tried another paragraph. But first we looked at a successful paragraph from last class:

Bilbo Baggins begins to enjoy violence after his initial success killing a spider. When Bilbo fights the spiders, he is scaring them off with his Sting. Tolkien writes that “Bilbo was dancing about and waving his Sting” (163). By saying Bilbo is “dancing” it gives off the impression of having fun as he scares them because dancing is used with happy, upbeat feelings the majority of the time. It is important to understand how Bilbo has changed because he used to be very uptight with his decisions and now he has become very brave and enjoys the feats he has accomplished.

Next, students were asked to write a paragraph using the support and evidence from the puzzle piece of their choice. This took about 10-15 minutes. Students turned in their paragraphs for a grade.

5. ACE-IT notes. Students received this handout that gives an overview of the structures of paragraph writing: ACEIT

6. Filming a page of The Hobbit. Students opened up their books to page 17. After I read aloud the page, they worked with their partners to decide how they would want to film that scene in order to get the correct tone across. They storyboarded 4-6 shots of their scene.

7. We watched this scene in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. As students watched, they wrote down all the film techniques they saw. Click here to watch the scene. 

5. Film comparisons. Students viewed four different versions of an adaptation of Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations. We took notes on their differences using this graphic organizer: Great Expectations graphic organizer. Here are three of the scenes:

#1. 1948, Dir. David Lean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A-MvsZ2QxwM

Start watching at 1:08:52 and stop at 1:11:40

#2. 1999, Dir. Julian Jarrold

start at 1:37

#3. is copyrighted. It’s the BBC version shown on Masterpiece Classics with Gillian Anderson as Mrs. Havisham.

#4. 2012, Dir. Mike Newell, Adaptation by David Nicholls

http://www.crushable.com/2012/09/03/entertainment/great-expectations-clip-ralph-fiennes-magwitch-jeremy-irvine-pip-952/

HW: Read Chapter 11 for Monday. If you want to rewrite your ACE-IT paragraph, bring it on Monday.

December 12: A Day December 12, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral quiz on Chapters 10 and 11.

3. ACE-IT paragraph writing. Students chose a few sentences from Chapter 10 or 11 to annotate on their own and write an analysis paragraph using the ACE-IT formula. Here is the sheet we used: outsiders motif writing.

4. Film terminology. In preparation for watching The Outsiders on Friday, we learned some of the following film terms: Film terminology blank

HW: Read the final chapter of The Outsiders.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Events of The Hobbit. Students took two minutes to list all of the events of the story so far. We then discussed which scenes may be left out or compressed for the sake of film.

3. ACE-IT practice. Students received feedback on their last ACE-IT paragraphs and then tried another paragraph. But first we looked at a successful paragraph from last class:

Slide1

Next, students were asked to consider how the evidence in green proves this assertion in red:

Slide2

They discussed with a partner and then we shared out as a class. Finally, students were asked to write a new paragraph starting with the assertion provided and adding the CEI steps of ACE-IT on their own. They were to choose only one piece of evidence. If you were absent, do this at home and bring in your paragraph for a grade.

4. We finished filling out our Film Terminology sheets (L11). Here’s a blank copy: Film terminology blank

HW: Read Chapter 10 for tomorrow and add motif notes. Also, find a film review of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and print it out. A good place to look is Rotten Tomatoes; from there click Full Review and print.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Brief share-out about Hobbit film reviews.

3. Practice finding evidence for your assertion. Students worked in pairs to solve a puzzle that required them to match assertions with evidence from The Hobbit.

4. ACE-IT practice. Students received feedback on their last ACE-IT paragraphs and then tried another paragraph. But first we looked at a successful paragraph from last class:

Slide1

Next, students were asked to consider how the evidence in green proves this assertion in red:

Slide2

They discussed with a partner and then we shared out as a class. Finally, students were asked to write a new paragraph starting with the assertion provided and adding the CEI steps of ACE-IT on their own. They were to choose only one piece of evidence. If you were absent, do this at home and bring in your paragraph for a grade.

5. Film comparisons. Students viewed two different versions of an adaptation of Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations. Here are the two scenes:

#1

1948, Dir. David Lean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A-MvsZ2QxwM

Start watching at 1:08:52 and stop at 1:11:40

 

#2

2012, Dir. Mike Newell, Adaptation by David Nicholls

http://www.crushable.com/2012/09/03/entertainment/great-expectations-clip-ralph-fiennes-magwitch-jeremy-irvine-pip-952/

As they watched, they took notes on the differences here: Great Expectations graphic organizer

HW: Read Chapter 11 and the first 3 pages of Chapter 12. Do motif notes for Chapter 11. If you want to rewrite your ACE-IT paragraph, bring it on either Friday or Tuesday.

December 12, 2012

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2012, Dir. Mike Newell, Adaptation by David Nicholls

http://www.crushable.com/2012/09/03/entertainment/great-expectations-clip-ralph-fiennes-magwitch-jeremy-irvine-pip-952/

1948, Dir. David Lean

1:08:52-1:11:40

1999, Dir. Julian Jarrold

1:37

December 11: B Day December 11, 2012

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite: What could characters have done to stop the rumble?

3. Dramatization: Students worked in groups of 4-6 to act out one possible alternate solution to the rumble. 

4. Focused freewrite: What common solutions did you see? Why did none of those solutions occur in The Outsiders?

5. Oral quiz on Chapter 8 and 9.

6. SCOPE and annotation. Students received this sheet: Close Reading and Annotation (front) and Annotation gold (back). As a class, we took notes on SCOPE. Here they are: 

Summarize the difficult parts.

Connect the passage to your life, other books, history, other events in the novel, and the big pictures

Opinions: Write them down.

Pose Questions

Exclaim your thoughts and feelings

7. Find your own passage. Students chose their own few sentences from Chapter 8 or 9 to annotate on their own. Here is the sheet we used: outsiders motif writing.

HW: Read Chapters 10 and 11 for Thursday.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral Quiz on Chapters 8 and 9.

3. Film terminology. Students received notes on different techniques used in films and we discussed the effect of each. Here is a blank version of the handout and a version with the completed notes: Film Terminology. We will finish this tomorrow.

HW: Read Chapter 10 for Thursday and take motif notes. Also, find a film review of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and print it out. A good place to look is Rotten Tomatoes; from there click Full Review and print.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral quiz on Chapters 8 and 9. 

3. ACE-IT practice. Students received feedback on their last ACE-IT paragraphs and then tried another paragraph. But first we looked at a successful paragraph from last class:

Slide1

Next, students were asked to consider how the evidence in green proves this assertion in red:

Slide2

 

They discussed with a partner and then we shared out as a class. Finally, students were asked to write a new paragraph starting with the assertion provided and adding the CEI steps of ACE-IT on their own. They were to choose only one piece of evidence. If you were absent, do this at home and bring in your paragraph for a grade.

4. Film terminology. Students received notes on different techniques used in films and we discussed the effect of each. Here is a blank version of the handout and a version with the completed notes: Film Terminology.

HW: Read Chapter 10 for Thursday and take motif notes. Also, find a film review of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and print it out. A good place to look is Rotten Tomatoes; from there click Full Review and print.

December 10: A Day December 10, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral quiz on Chapter 9.

3. SCOPE and annotation. Students received this sheet: Close Reading and Annotation (front) and Annotation gold (back). As a class, we took notes on SCOPE. Here they are: 

Summarize the difficult parts.

Connect the passage to your life, other books, history, other events in the novel, and the big pictures

Opinions: Write them down.

Pose Questions

Exclaim your thoughts and feelings

4. What could have happened? We gathered in groups to perform skits of how Chapter 9 would have been different if the gangs had decided not to fight.

5. Focused freewrite: Students responded to the prompt, “Why did the events in Chapter 9 have to happen? Why did our alternative scenarios not happen?”

HW: Read Chapters 10 and 11 for Wednesday.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Announcements: Students should bring a lunch on Friday if they’re going to the field trip since we won’t be back to Grafton until 1:00. Also, students interested in joining the Grafton Publishing Club to help decide which memoirs to publish, we’ll begin meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays after school in computer lab 204 from 2:15-3:30. Anyone who loves reading and writing would fit in here! Food provided!

3. Reading time. I collected students’ ACE-IT paragraphs. Then, students had the period to read and work on their annotations as I checked their annotations for Chapter 7.

HW: Read Ch. 8 and 9 and do motif annotations for tomorrow.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite. What is the intended audience for The Hobbit? How do you know? We discussed answers to this question and then discussed how the audience for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (the Peter Jackson movie) is different.

3. Announcements: Students should bring a lunch on Friday if they’re going to the field trip since we won’t be back to Grafton until 1:00. Also, students interested in joining the Grafton Publishing Club to help decide which memoirs to publish, we’ll begin meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays after school in computer lab 204 from 2:15-3:30. Anyone who loves reading and writing would fit in here! Food provided!

4. Oral quiz on Chapters 8 and 9. 

5. Film terminology. Students received notes on different techniques used in films and we discussed the effect of each. Here is a blank version of the handout and a version with the completed notes: Film Terminology.

6. Filming a page of The Hobbit. Students opened up their books to page 17. After I read aloud the page, they worked with their partners to decide how they would want to film that scene in order to get the correct tone across. They storyboarded 4-6 shots of their scene.

7. We watched this scene in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. As students watched, they wrote down all the film techniques they saw. Click here to watch the scene. 

HW: Read Chapter 10 and take motif notes. Also, find a film review of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and print it out.

Here’s something cool to watch: all the making-of videos for The Hobbit:

December 7: B Day (shortened schedule) December 7, 2012

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1B

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite. Students wrote for four minutes to this prompt: If a character from The Outsiders walked into Grafton High School today and you were assigned to be their buddy, to show them to their classes and make sure they didn’t sit alone in the cafeteria, what would you tell that character? How would you act toward them? What tips would you give them?

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 7.

4. Chapter 8 reading time.

HW: Read Chapter 8 and 9 and find five examples of your motif in chapters 8 and 9 (10 examples for both chapters combined).

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite: What is the intended audience for The Hobbit? How do you know? We discussed answers to this question and then discussed how the audience for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (the Peter Jackson movie) is different.

3. Chapter 7 oral quiz.

4. Students continued working on their Hobbit motif writing to analyze passage they selected from the text related to their motif. Students who didn’t finish this in class need to finish it for homework.

HW: Read Chapter 8 and 9 and annotate for motifs by Tuesday. Read Chapter 10 by next Thursday.

4B

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite: What is the intended audience for The Hobbit? How do you know? We discussed answers to this question and then discussed how the audience for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (the Peter Jackson movie) is different.

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 7. 

5. Analysis of the dwarves’ wind song. We read the dwarves’ wind song aloud and discussed each stanza. Since dwarves are seldom as direct as Hobbits (and people) wish them to be, we often have to read into their songs to understand what this mission is all about. I suggested the wind was not just wind but something else. Students came up with what the wind might be (the dwarves themselves) and made an assertion about what the song suggests about The Hobbit in general. 

6. Students received their evaluated Ace-it paragraphs from last class with comments. They then used the Ace-it formula to prove the assertion that the dwarves are extremely confident about the fact that this mission will be a success. They wrote this paragraph in class and turned it in as they left. Any students who wish to correct the paragraph they wrote last class for a new grade may do so.

HW: Read Chapter 8 and 9 and annotate for motifs by Tuesday. This is a lot of reading, but we need to read it before going to our movie next week. That’s why I’m assigning two chapters for Tuesday. Read Chapter 10 by next Thursday. 

 

December 6: A Day December 6, 2012

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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite. Students wrote for four minutes to this prompt: If a character from The Outsiders walked into Grafton High School today and you were assigned to be their buddy, to show them to their classes and make sure they didn’t sit alone in the cafeteria, what would you tell that character? How would you act toward them? What tips would you give them?

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 7.

4. Sentence corrections focused on subject-verb agreement.

5. Press conference. Students were assigned to be either characters or reporters. Characters came up with a three sentence statement for the press. Reporters came up with three questions to ask characters.

6. Chapter 8 read-aloud. We finished reading Chapter 8 in class.

HW: Read Chapter 9 and find five examples of your motif in chapters 8 and 9 combined.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Annotation practice. As a class, we annotated this passage:

Mr. Baggins saw then how clever Gandalf had been. The interruptions had really made Beorn more interested in the story, and the story had kept him from sending the dwarves off at once like suspicious beggars.   (124)

3. Next, students came up with some assertions we could make based on this annotation. I then modeled how to write a strong paragraph using the ACE-IT model. Here is the paragraph we came up with:

The interruptions in The Hobbit aren’t pointless; in fact, they are crucial steps to reaching the climax of the story. When the dwarves first arrive at Beorn’s house, they have entered slowly, two at a time. Tolkien writes that “[t]he interruptions had really made Beorn more interested in the story,” rather than making him think they are pointless (124). Since these interruptions make Beorn “more interested,” the reader can infer that they are essential elements of the story. Of course, what is a story if the listener or reader isn’t “interested”? Just like the dwarves interrupting Gandalf’s story, the various events in The Hobbit leading up to the climax create interest for the reader. If the reader misses the fact that these interruptions are interesting, she might skip over them, further missing the heroism of Bilbo Baggins.

4. Students received Hobbit motif writing to help them use the ACE-IT formula for a passage they selected from the text related to their motif.

HW: Read Chapter 8 and 9 and annotate for motifs by Tuesday. Read Chapter 10 by next Thursday.

4A

1. Freewrite.

2. Focused freewrite: Why is Bilbo even on this journey if he doesn’t need the money and it has nothing to do with his ancestors? We read our answers and discussed this question briefly.

3. Oral Quiz on Chapter 7. 

5. Analysis of the dwarves’ wind song. Students received this printout (the wind poem ch 7) to help them analyze what this song is actually about. Since dwarves are seldom as direct as Hobbits (and people) wish them to be, we often have to read into their songs to understand what this mission is all about. I suggested the wind was not just wind but something else. Students worked in teams to analyze the poem and illustrate each stanza. Here is a great example of what we came up with:

 IMG_0848

6. ACE-IT Paragraph model. Based on our assertions about the poem, I modeled for students how to apply the ACE-IT paragraph structure (Assertion, Context, Evidence, Interpretation, Transition). Here is the paragraph I came up with on the spot, much to the delight of my fascinated audience (they did give me a round of applause, of course):

Tolkien suggests that the dwarves’ quest will be successful by including the wind song. In the very last line of the poem, recited after dinner at Beorn’s house, the dwarves sing that “stars were fanned to leaping light” (127). Tolkien describes the end of the wind’s journey as one of “leaping light,” suggesting that everything has worked out for the best and the dwarves have moved from their dark business of revenge into the light of success. Additionally, the use of the word “stars” implies that this “leaping light” of a success was intended by fate: the stars had destined the dwarves to be successful. It is important to understand that the song implies success because this is foreshadowing the end of the novel.

7. ACE-IT applied! Students chose their own few sentences from Chapter 6 or 7 to annotate on their own and write an analysis paragraph using the ACE-IT formula. Here is the sheet we used: Hobbit motif writing. If students didn’t finish it in class, they should finish it for homework.

HW: Read Chapter 8 and 9 and annotate for motifs by Tuesday. This is a lot of reading, but we need to read it before going to our movie next week. That’s why I’m assigning two chapters for Tuesday. Read Chapter 10 by next Thursday.