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January 3: A Day January 3, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Freewrite.

2. Vocabulary. Students got notes for our next vocabulary unit. You can download them here: V3 WS Lesson 2 with SAT words. We took notes on #1-5. If you were absent, you should download the notes and fill out what you missed by looking here.

3. Notes on Thesis Statements. Students received W6, an introduction to high school-style theses. Download here: Thesis Statements.

Here are the notes to fill in:

What is it? A statement of a position you will prove to be true

Why do I need one? It tells your reader where your essay is going

How long is it? Usually one sentence, up to three sentences [You should only use more than one sentence if you are a very confident writer or if your topic is very complex.]

Where does it go? The last sentence(s) of your introduction before your first body paragraph.

When do you use it? Persuasive essays, i.e. all History and English essays

A good thesis statement has the strength of DADS:

Debatable: Can you have an argument about it?

Analytical: Is it relevant to the field (i.e. English or The Outsiders studies) or is it your random opinion? [Example of your random opinion: If Johnny were a historical figure, he would be Abraham Lincoln. This is random and unrelated.]

Defensible: Can you prove it? Is there evidence?

Specific: Does it answer the questions how and why?

5. Altered Book Project. We began doing some prewriting for the project we are about to start on The Outsiders. Students received this sheet to fill out in class: Altered book-Assignment Sheet. Most students finished only the first side of boxes. We will look at some examples and begin creating our altered books on Monday.

HW: None.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Short discussion on Baggins/Took traits started yesterday.

3. Notes on Thesis Statements. Students received W6, an introduction to high school-style theses. Download here: Thesis Statements.

Here are the notes to fill in:

What is it? A statement of a position you will prove to be true

Why do I need one? It tells your reader where your essay is going

How long is it? Usually one sentence, up to three sentences [You should only use more than one sentence if you are a very confident writer or if your topic is very complex.]

Where does it go? The last sentence(s) of your introduction before your first body paragraph.

When do you use it? Persuasive essays, i.e. all History and English essays

A good thesis statement has the strength of DADS:

Debatable: Can you have an argument about it?

Analytical: Is it relevant to the field (i.e. English or The Hobbit studies) or is it your random opinion? [Example of your random opinion: If Bilbo Baggins were a historical figure, he would be Abraham Lincoln. This is random and unrelated.]

Defensible: Can you prove it? Is there evidence?

Specific: Does it answer the questions how and why?

4. Practice revising theses. Students turned their sheet over to the back and, in pairs, worked to make non-DADS theses into DADS theses.

5. Motif group theses. Next, students gathered in their motif groups to start coming up with a thesis statement of their own. They used this as a guide: W7: Writing a Thesis Statement. Groups will solidify their theses in class tomorrow.

HW: None.

4A

1. Stories from break.

2. Freewrite.

3. The Hobbit oral quiz through the end of the novel. If you didn’t get your question right, catch up on the reading. A low quiz score will be waiting for you soon on Edline.

4. Bilbo…Baggins or Took? Every student in class found one quote anywhere in the novel that demonstrated whether Bilbo was more Baggins or Took at a certain moment in the story. We wrote our quotes on a sticky note (green for Baggins, orange for Took) and put them on the board. We briefly discussed trends, surprised that Bilbo was relatively consistent throughout the whole novel.

5. Notes on Thesis Statements. Students received W6, an introduction to high school-style theses. Download here: Thesis Statements.

Here are the notes to fill in:

What is it? A statement of a position you will prove to be true

Why do I need one? It tells your reader where your essay is going

How long is it? Usually one sentence, up to three sentences [You should only use more than one sentence if you are a very confident writer or if your topic is very complex.]

Where does it go? The last sentence(s) of your introduction before your first body paragraph.

When do you use it? Persuasive essays, i.e. all History and English essays

A good thesis statement has the strength of DADS:

Debatable: Can you have an argument about it?

Analytical: Is it relevant to the field (i.e. English or The Hobbit studies) or is it your random opinion? [Example of your random opinion: If Bilbo Baggins were a historical figure, he would be Abraham Lincoln. This is random and unrelated.]

Defensible: Can you prove it? Is there evidence?

Specific: Does it answer the questions how and why?

6. Practice revising theses. Students turned their sheet over to the back and, in pairs, worked to make non-DADS theses into DADS theses.

7. Motif group theses. Next, students gathered in their motif groups to start coming up with a thesis statement of their own. They used an idea board as a guide: W7: Developing a Thesis Statement idea board. Groups will solidify their theses in class Monday.

HW: None. Catch up on motif notes and reading if needed (this only applies to a few students).

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