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Body Paragraph Format January 10, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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ONE PERSON COPY:

Group member 1, Group member 2, Group member 3, Group member 4, etc. (change each group member’s name to a different, dark color)

Ms. Garvoille

English 9: 1B

17 January 2013

[title]

Put your thesis here in the place where your intro paragraph would go.

EVERY PERSON COPY:

replace each sentence with your own as you type

1: (be sure to indent using the Tab button) Topic sentence goes here; this is the sentence from W8 in the box that was yours. 2: Use this sentence to connect your topic sentence to your thesis if it’s not clear how it connects (optional). NOT ON SHEET, YOU NEED TO ADD: Introduce your first piece of evidence by stating what part of your topic sentence you will prove: for example, if your topic sentence is “Johnny is courageous,” and your first point of evidence is about Johnny being courageous when he kills Bob, your introducing sentence would be “Johnny is courageous in fights.” 3. Set up your evidence by telling us what part of the novel you’ll be talking about so your reader knows what you’re talking about; start your sentence like, “When ____, Johnny ____” or “Consider when _____.” 4. Give your first piece of evidence incorporated into your own sentence by writing something like “Johnny says, “___” (35).” or “Hinton writes, “_____” (35). Be sure to include the page number in parentheses before the period. 5. Interpret a small part of your evidence that proves your topic sentence. Focus on a specific word or phrase. Your sentence might say, “By using the word ____, Hinton is suggesting [connection to topic sentence].” or “When Johnny calls Bob “____,” he means ______.” You will take a part of the evidence you’ve already given in #4 to explain in more depth. 6/7. Transition into your next piece of evidence. For example, “In addition to [summary of point 1], Johnny also [point 2].” or “In addition to being courageous during fights, Johnny also shows courage when caring for others in dangerous situations.” Introduce your first piece of evidence by stating what part of your topic sentence you will prove: for example, if your topic sentence is “Johnny is courageous,” and your first point of evidence is about Johnny being courageous when he kills Bob, your introducing sentence would be “Johnny is courageous in fights.” 8. Set up your evidence by telling us what part of the novel you’ll be talking about so your reader knows what you’re talking about; start your sentence like, “When ____, Johnny ____” or “Consider when _____.” or “When Johnny and Ponyboy are in the church in Windrixville, it’s Johnny who goes out to get supplies for him and Ponyboy. 9. Give your second piece of evidence incorporated into your own sentence by writing something like “Johnny says, “___” (35).” or “Hinton writes, “_____” (35). Be sure to include the page number in parentheses before the period. 10. Interpret a small part of your evidence that proves your topic sentence. Focus on a specific word or phrase. Your sentence might say, “By using the word ____, Hinton is suggesting [connection to topic sentence].” or “When Johnny writes to Ponyboy “Be back soon,” he sounds like a parent writing a note to his child telling him not to worry. It is courageous of him to think of himself as the responsible person and Ponyboy as his child.” 11/12. Transition into your next piece of evidence. For example, “In addition to [summary of point 1 and 2], Johnny also [point 3].” or “In addition to being courageous during fights and dangerous situations, Johnny furthermore shows courage when facing death.” 13. Set up your evidence by telling us what part of the novel you’ll be talking about so your reader knows what you’re talking about; start your sentence like, “When ____, Johnny ____” or “Consider when _____.” 14. Give your third piece of evidence incorporated into your own sentence by writing something like “Johnny says, “___” (35).” or “Hinton writes, “_____” (35). Be sure to include the page number in parentheses before the period. 15. Interpret a small part of your evidence that proves your topic sentence. Focus on a specific word or phrase. Your sentence might say, “By using the word ____, Hinton is suggesting [connection to topic sentence].” 16. Conclude your paragraph by reviewing all your evidence and reminding your reader of the importance of your point. For example, “By showing courage in dangerous situations, Johnny proves he is [reference to thesis statement].”

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