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January 14: B Day January 14, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

Today we met in the computer lab. Students should be done writing their body paragraph by now. If you still need direction on your body paragraph, here is a template for you to cut and paste into your document. Then, you should replace each numbered section with your own sentence.

1: (be sure to indent using the Tab button) Topic sentence goes here; this is the sentence from W8 in the box that was yours. 2: Use this sentence to connect your topic sentence to your thesis if it’s not clear how it connects (optional). NOT ON SHEET, YOU NEED TO ADD: Introduce your first piece of evidence by stating what part of your topic sentence you will prove: for example, if your topic sentence is “Johnny is courageous,” and your first point of evidence is about Johnny being courageous when he kills Bob, your introducing sentence would be “Johnny is courageous in fights.” 3. Set up your evidence by telling us what part of the novel you’ll be talking about so your reader knows what you’re talking about; start your sentence like, “When ____, Johnny ____” or “Consider when _____.” 4. Give your first piece of evidence incorporated into your own sentence by writing something like “Johnny says, “___” (35).” or “Hinton writes, “_____” (35). Be sure to include the page number in parentheses before the period. 5. Interpret a small part of your evidence that proves your topic sentence. Focus on a specific word or phrase. Your sentence might say, “By using the word ____, Hinton is suggesting [connection to topic sentence].” or “When Johnny calls Bob “____,” he means ______.” You will take a part of the evidence you’ve already given in #4 to explain in more depth. 6/7. Transition into your next piece of evidence. For example, “In addition to [summary of point 1], Johnny also [point 2].” or “In addition to being courageous during fights, Johnny also shows courage when caring for others in dangerous situations.” Introduce your first piece of evidence by stating what part of your topic sentence you will prove: for example, if your topic sentence is “Johnny is courageous,” and your first point of evidence is about Johnny being courageous when he kills Bob, your introducing sentence would be “Johnny is courageous in fights.” 8. Set up your evidence by telling us what part of the novel you’ll be talking about so your reader knows what you’re talking about; start your sentence like, “When ____, Johnny ____” or “Consider when _____.” or “When Johnny and Ponyboy are in the church in Windrixville, it’s Johnny who goes out to get supplies for him and Ponyboy. 9. Give your second piece of evidence incorporated into your own sentence by writing something like “Johnny says, “___” (35).” or “Hinton writes, “_____” (35). Be sure to include the page number in parentheses before the period. 10. Interpret a small part of your evidence that proves your topic sentence. Focus on a specific word or phrase. Your sentence might say, “By using the word ____, Hinton is suggesting [connection to topic sentence].” or “When Johnny writes to Ponyboy “Be back soon,” he sounds like a parent writing a note to his child telling him not to worry. It is courageous of him to think of himself as the responsible person and Ponyboy as his child.” 11/12. Transition into your next piece of evidence. For example, “In addition to [summary of point 1 and 2], Johnny also [point 3].” or “In addition to being courageous during fights and dangerous situations, Johnny furthermore shows courage when facing death.” 13. Set up your evidence by telling us what part of the novel you’ll be talking about so your reader knows what you’re talking about; start your sentence like, “When ____, Johnny ____” or “Consider when _____.” 14. Give your third piece of evidence incorporated into your own sentence by writing something like “Johnny says, “___” (35).” or “Hinton writes, “_____” (35). Be sure to include the page number in parentheses before the period. 15. Interpret a small part of your evidence that proves your topic sentence. Focus on a specific word or phrase. Your sentence might say, “By using the word ____, Hinton is suggesting [connection to topic sentence].” 16. Conclude your paragraph by reviewing all your evidence and reminding your reader of the importance of your point. For example, “By showing courage in dangerous situations, Johnny proves he is [reference to thesis statement].”

Some students were ahead, so they received W11, The Introduction Paragraph and The Conclusion ParagraphWe will look at these as a class on Wednesday.

HW: Finish your body paragraph if not done. If your body paragraph wasn’t completed in class today, you have a zero on Edline.

2AB

Today was a workday on the essay.

HW: Continue revising essay, making changes to others’ paragraphs in your color if needed.

4B

1. Students received a review sheet for the mid-term exam: Advanced English 9 Midterm Review Sheet

2. Students double-checked the consistency of their topic sentences with their thesis using W13: Finishing an Essay. Each group received individual feedback from Ms. Garvoille. On the back of W13 is a checklist for students to go through to make sure their essay is perfect.

3. Works Cited page and Titles. Students learned the Works Cited song. It goes to the tune of Old MacDonald:

“Author’s last name comma first name [peri-eri-od]

Title of the book in italics [peri-eri-od] *original publication daaaate*

Pub[lishing] location colon

And then Pub[lishing] name

Add a comma, then the date, (ch!) 

You’re almost done with it,

The last thing you add is Print or Web [peri-eri-od]”

Here are the notes: W12: The Works Cited Page

4. Students created a catchy title using the back of W12, The Title.

HW: Finish your essay before class on Wednesday. You do not need to print it off. Begin studying for your final.

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