jump to navigation

March 4: B Day March 4, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
trackback

1B

1. Warm-up. In order to practice how to integrate quotes from research into writing, we did this exercise:

Copy and paste what’s between the lines into a word document. Then, rearrange the information so that all the positive reviews and all the negative reviews are together. Next, turn the reviews into complete sentences using the sentence structures and transitions.

____

Intro sentence: The Lightning Thief received mostly positive reviews.

“perfectly paced, with electrifying moments chasing each other like heartbeats” (New York Times)

“[r]eaders will be eager to follow the young protagonist’s next move” (Kirkus)

“choppy” writing (Common Sense Media)

shallow characters (Common Sense Media)

4 stars out of 5 (Common Sense Media)

“A fantastic blend of myth and modern” (Eoin Colfer, author ofArtemis Fowl)

“”swift and humorous” (Publishers Weekly)

would ”leave many readers eager for the next installment.” (Publishers Weekly)

——-

2. Type in your heading into Drive. Here is a list of possible sections (you won’t use all of them, most likely):

Major themes

Background

Publication history

Reception

Awards and nominations

Adaptations

If you’re working in a group, you need to assign who will work on which section and divide up your research cards for each person.

3. Write a topic sentence for each section. If your section is especially long (you have a lot of pink cards with that category checked), you may write a few different topic sentences to correspond to the different ideas in your section. Here are some topic sentence starters and examples:

Major themes

  • Titleofnovel addresses the themes of ______, ______, and ______.
  • Critics have suggested that Titleofnovel deals with issues of _______ and ________.
  • Titleofnovel is seen as ______________.

Background

  • [Briefly overview in one sentence what your Background notes address.]

Publication history

  • [No topic sentence needed here; just get straight to the facts.]

Reception

  • Titleofnovel has received mostly positive reviews.
  • Titleofnovel has received mostly negative reviews.
  • Titleofnovel has received mixed reviews.
  • Titleofnovel is interpreted by most critics as _________ (if you’re dealing with literary criticism).

Awards and nominations

  • [No topic sentence needed; just get straight to the facts.]

Adaptations

  • Titleofnovel has been adapted into __________ (a film, an audiobook, etc.).

4. Next, you will introduce your research quotes and facts. For example:

  • Nameofreviewer of Nameofjournal suggested that “_______” (Nicknameoncard).
  • Nameofjournal praised Titleofnovel as “_________” (Nicknameoncard).
  • Critics have suggested that ____________ (Nicknameoncard).
  • Nameofjournal added, “___________” (Nicknameoncard).

All of these sentence patterns can also be found here: Literature Reviews

Here are some good examples if you click the links:

Major themes

Style

Reception

Publication history

HW: None. We will continue our work next class.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Oral Quiz on Act II.

3. Balcony scene charades.

HW: Read Act II if you have not. Many students did not. You’re missing some great stuff! Here are videos for you to watch while you read:

Listen to Act II online.

To download the entire recording click here: iTunes or Complete File.

Watch Act II:

Start watching at 2:48

And watch this amazing version of the balcony scene, which I saw live this summer:

4B

1. Turn in revision of Song Analysis.

2. ACE-IT on love or lust. Each student chose a quote from II.ii. They then analyzed the quote to see whether it showed love or lust. We wrote paragraphs proving our points. These we collected for a grade.

3. Oral quiz on Act II scenes i and ii.

4. Read Act II, scene iii aloud as a class, analyzing.

5. Read Act II, scenes iv – iv aloud or silently in small groups or alone. Students had to stop after every line to summarize as they read.

HW: Read all of Act II and Act III, scene 1.

Listen to Act II online.

To download the entire recording click here: iTunes or Complete File.

Watch Act II:

Start watching at 2:48

And watch this amazing version of the balcony scene, which I saw live this summer:

Listen to Act III online.

To download the entire recording click here: iTunes or Complete File.

Watch Act III before, after, or as you read here: (BE SURE TO PAUSE TO READ FOOTNOTES!)

*1978 version*

Act III, scene i

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: