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March 27: A Day March 27, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Focused freewrite: Why do we dream what we do? Is there any meaning behind dreams? 

2. Oral Quiz on I.iii of R and J.

3. Read, listen, and watch I.iv.

4. Moving to understand: Students gathered in a circle in the atrium to more closely read Mercutio’s speech. First, we walked through all the lines, turning small turns at small punctuation and big turns at big punctuation. Then, we came up with pantomimes to illustrate difficult parts of the text to an audience.

5. Watch I.v in the classroom:

HW: None. Get your own copy of Romeo and Juliet over spring break if you don’t want to lug a textbook home.

2AB

1. Rehearsal time.

2. Watching performances. We saw the Balcony scene, the Fight, and the Goodbye. As students watched, they filled out scenework audience participation

HW: Bring back your scripts and your audience participation sheet for tomorrow! If you haven’t presented yet, make sure you’re prepared!

4A

1. Rehearsal time.

2. Watching performances. We saw the Party, the Balcony Scene, the Fight, Fake Death, and The End. As students watched, they filled out scenework audience participation

3. Reflection. Students answered the following questions about their scenes:

  • Actor’s statement: How does your portrayal of a character contribute to your group’s angle on the scene? What should the audience watch for as you perform your lines?
  • How does the blocking of your scene in general reflect your group’s angle?
  • What is your favorite line? Describe how you applied a speaking technique to that lines and why. Include your line, what you did with your voice, and why you decided to apply it the way you did. Consider your character’s motivation, the audience’s understanding, or the angle of your scene.
  • Describe your favorite pantomime. Include the line/phrase, what you did with your hands, and why you decided this line needed a pantomime. Consider your character’s motivation, the audience’s understanding, or the angle of your scene.
  • How has your understanding of Shakespeare’s language in general changed between when you first read it in the play and now, after you have performed it? Consider how paraphrasing, speaking, blocking, and performing change your relationship with the text.
  • What was the biggest challenge you faced? Consider the following: understanding the lines, using pantomime, identifying and applying voice techniques, blocking, working with your group, getting everything done within a certain time frame, etc. Explain how you overcame that challenge.
  • What is your favorite part of your group’s performance? This could be either something you do or something others in your group do.
  • What is the best idea you brought to your group?
  • Describe your group dynamics by explaining how each group member contributed. Focus on strengths. Consider who acted as director most of the time, who gave feedback on lines, who helped everyone understand what the lines meant, who had the most ideas for cutting the lines, etc.
  • What grade do you deserve and why?

HW: If you did not complete your reflection in class, complete it at home for Friday.

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