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ACE-IT May 17, 2013

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Assertion: State your topic sentence

  • causes y as a result of …. which shows …
  • In ___, (author’s name) implies…
  • The author uses ___ to show/achieve…
  • What the author is saying is …
  • Given that x happened, the author is trying to show…
  • X is not ___ but is, instead, _____ since…
  • Although x is increasing/decreasing, it is not y but z that is the cause…
  • was, in the past, the most important factor, but y has changed, making it the real cause

Contextualize and deliver your Evidence (C-E) for your assertion. Some examples of how to do this:

  • One example of x appears early on when Y does z
  • proves this when he does y, a gesture that clearly shows z
  • During ______, is _____.
  • (Summary of events)
  • Consider ___________.

Evidence: Deliver your quote

  • Reporting verbs: writes, states, says, describes, asserts, etc.
  • X (reporting verb) that “_______” (#).
  • As (reporting verb), “____________” (#).
  • X (reporting verb) (phrase summary of quote): “______” (#).
  • X describes ____ as “_______” (#).
  • When describing ____, X calls it “____” (#).

Interpret your quote

  • If X had wanted the reading to think (phrase summary of opposite), she wouldn’t have used the phrase “____” which suggests ____.
  • By using the word “__,” X suggests…
  • The phrase “___” implies…
  • The description of ___ as “___” makes the reader think…

Transition or Explain why your point matters

  • This discussion of X is in fact addressing the larger matter of ____.
  • X matters/is important because_____.
  • Although X may seem trivial, it is in fact crucial to understanding the novel because _____.
  • X has important consequences for the reader’s broader understanding of Y because ____.
  • What ____ really means is ____.

TRANSITION WORDS TO USE

A and I: Cause and Effect

accordingly
as a result
consequently
hence
it follows, then
since
so
then
therefore
thus
nevertheless

I and T: Conclusion
as a result
consequently
hence
in conclusion, then
in short
it follows, then
so
therefore
thus
to sum up
to summarize

A and T: Comparison
along the same lines
in the same way
likewise
similarly
similar to
identical to
much like
comparable to
in the same manner

Counterargument: Concession (saying something is true)
admittedly
although it is true that
granted
of course
naturally
to be sure

A, I, and T: Contrast
although
but
by / in contrast
conversely
despite the fact that
even though
however
nevertheless
nonetheless
on the contrary
on the other hand
regardless
whereas
while
yet

E: Example
after all
as an illustration
consider
for example
for instance
specifically
in fact
A and E: Addition
also
and
besides
furthermore
in addition
in fact
indeed
moreover
so too
additionally
likewise
along the same lines

I and T: Elaboration
actually
by extension
in short
that is
in other words
to put it another way
to put it bluntly
to put it succinctly
ultimately

– Add a conclusion sentence for your paragraph that transitions into the next paragraph.

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May 13, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Click here for today’s instructions — you will view them in Google Drive.

May 8, 9, and 10 May 10, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B/1A/1B

We had our final rehearsal days for our performances! 1A performs on Monday, 1B on Tuesday! Each group got some individualized help from Ms. G.

HW: Practice your lines and blocking and pantomimes at home

2AB

Wednesday was a reading day for students to catch up in their novels.

Thursday and Friday was devoted to learning how to use Wikipedia. Students all received usernames and completed this activity:

Click here for today’s instructions — you will view them in Google Drive.

HW: Finish reading your novel for Monday.

4A

On Thursday, students completed a timed-write reading quiz over the theme of their novel. This helped us practice close reading skills and essay organization.

HW: Finish reading your novel for Monday.

4B

Wednesday was devoted to learning how to use Wikipedia. Students all received usernames and completed this activity:

Click here for today’s instructions — you will view them in Google Drive.

Friday we took a timed-writing reading quiz over theme.

HW: Finish reading your novel for Tuesday

Intro to Wikipedia May 8, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Click here for today’s instructions — you will view them in Google Drive.

May 6 and 7 May 8, 2013

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1B/1A

Students worked on blocking, or stage movement, today. All groups will present their scenes the first day of class next week. Interested in what the rubric looks like? Here it is: Performance Rubric 2013.

HW: Rehearse your lines and blocking. You can memorize your lines for 5 points of extra credit!

2AB

1. Notes on Informational Writing Students received W14: Rules for Informational Writing. We took notes on #1 -4. Students practiced recognizing neutral and real-world writing by sorting these cards: NPOV and RWP practice sorting. When it comes to neutrality, I’ve noticed many students try to “sell” the book in their plot summaries by making it sound extra interesting, as if they’re writing jacket copy (the summary on the flap of a book cover written to help sell it). To remind students not to write in this tone, I did several dramatic jacket copy readings.

2. Midway discussions/reflection. Students finished reading halfway through their novels. They completed this activity on Tuesday: First reading discussions group and individual.

HW: Finish reading 3/4 of your novel by Friday.

4B/4A

1. Notes on Informational Writing Students received W14: Rules for Informational Writing. We took notes on #1 -4. Students practiced recognizing neutral and real-world writing by sorting these cards: NPOV and RWP practice sorting. When it comes to neutrality, I’ve noticed many students try to “sell” the book in their plot summaries by making it sound extra interesting, as if they’re writing jacket copy (the summary on the flap of a book cover written to help sell it). To remind students not to write in this tone, I did several dramatic jacket copy readings.

2. Midway discussions/reflection. Students finished reading halfway through their novels. They completed this activity on Tuesday: First reading discussions group and individual.

May 3: A Day May 3, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Students worked on using Speaking Shakespeare techniques.

2. Students started to incorporate Moving Shakespeare techniques into their performances. At this point, students should have identified 5 pantomimes to use during their lines.

HW: None.

2AB

1. Wikipedia Webquest. Students began this webquest to introduce them to Wikipedia. If you were gone, you can download the webquest here: Wikipedia Webquest. Here are the videos we watched for the first 3 sections of the webquest:

Great Feeling

Nice People

Beneath the Surface

Verifiability

HW: Finish your Webquest for Monday if you didn’t get it done in class. Also finish reading approximately 1/2 of your novel by Tuesday. Take your X-ray notes as you read!

4A

1. Freewrite.
2. Wikipedia Webquest. Students began this webquest to introduce them to Wikipedia. If you were gone, you can download the webquest here: Wikipedia Webquest. Here are the videos we watched for the first 3 sections of the webquest:

Great Feeling

Nice People

Beneath the Surface

Verifiability

 
HW: If you didn’t finish it in class, finish your Webquest for Tuesday. Also finish reading approximately 1/2 of your novel by Tuesday. Take your X-ray notes as you read!

May 2: B Day May 2, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1B

1. Students shared their paraphrases in their groups or finished paraphrasing if their homework was not completed.

2. Some students moved on to identifying and practicing Speaking Shakespeare techniques in their scripts.

HW: If you aren’t done paraphrasing lines in your script, you must finish them for next class.

2AB

1. Freewrite: What X-raying techniques are you using?

2. Wikipedia overview. I showed students some of the basic components of behind-the-scenes Wikipedia use. Tomorrow, we will do a webquest to introduce students to the basic.

3. Coming of Age poetry. Students chose one of the following poems:

Students annotated the poems in three steps:

1. Read the poem. If in a group, you may read it aloud. As you read, annotate for meaning. Rephrase, summarize, make connections, and question.

2. Then, annotate the poem for connections to coming of age. Mark words or phrases about:

  • growing up
  • adulthood
  • reality
  • childhood
  • rebellion / doing what you want
  • a traumatic event that may cause the character change

3. Finally, in a different colored pen / pencil, annotate the poem for possible connections to the book you’re reading.

4B

1. Freewrite: How does your protagonist show qualities of “innocence” so far?

2. Show and Tell/X-Raying a Book.

Every book has a skeleton hidden between its covers. Your job as an analytical reader is to find it.

A book comes to you with flesh on its bare bones and clothes over its flesh. It is all dressed up. You do not have to undress it or tear the flesh off its limbs to get at the firm structure that underlies the soft surface. But you must read the book with X-ray eyes, for it is an essential part of your apprehension of any book to grasp its structure.

Adler, Mortimer and Van Doren, Charles. How to Read a Book. New York: MJF Book, 1972. Print. p. 75

Read this wonderful, short essay by Mortimer Adler for more information on marking your book. I showed students a variety of examples of how to make notes on a book and today students decided what works best for them. Students must make notes on their books in some form, either in the book itself or on a separate sheet of paper, Google Document, or notebook.

Everyone must keep a chapter outline, where you write an extremely brief summary of each chapter. Here are some of mine:

IMG_1477

My outline for current favorite book Tender Is the Night

IMG_1478

My outline for Great Expectations, which I’m reading for the first time as an adult now.

You could also . . .

  • draw a map of the story
  • make a family tree
  • list characters
  • draw characters
  • create a timeline
  • write down words you don’t know
  • anything else that might help you

Yes, it’s true — there is no one way to do this! As you continue reading, you will develop your own methods and habits that will help you in college and beyond.

Here are some more examples:

IMG_1479

My drawings, timeline, and chapter summaries for Great Expectations

IMG_1480

A family tree for Great Expectations

IMG_1481

A set of symbols you might use to mark motifs in your margins.

Author and professor Vladimir Nabokov’s map of the novel Ulysses
Vladimir Nabokov’s drawings in The Metamorphosis

Here are some students X-Raying in 4A:

IMG_1475IMG_1476

3. Wikipedia overview. I showed students some of the basic components of behind-the-scenes Wikipedia use. Tomorrow, we will do a webquest to introduce students to the basic.
4. Wikipedia Webquest. Students began this webquest to introduce them to Wikipedia. If you were gone, you can download the webquest here: Wikipedia Webquest. Here are the videos we watched for the first 3 sections of the webquest:

Great Feeling

Nice People

Beneath the Surface

Verifiability

HW: Finish your Webquest for Monday. Also finish reading approximately 1/2 of your novel by Monday. Take your X-ray notes as you read!

May 1: A Day May 1, 2013

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1A

1. Students shared their paraphrases they did for homework with their groups. A few students forgot their scripts at home — don’t worry! I’ll give you credit for them next class.

2. Students identified places to use these speaking techniques in their scripts: Speaking Shakespeare. Then they read through their lines. We will work on blocking next class.

HW: None.

2AB

1. Freewrite.

2. Show and Tell/X-Raying a Book. See more at the end of this post.

HW: Finish reading approximately 1/4 of your novel by Friday. If you’re going to be gone on the band field trip you should read approximately 1/2 by Monday. Take your X-ray notes as you read!

4A

1. Freewrite: What do you know about your novel? How do you predict it might fit the bildungsroman?

2. Library time. Students chose a book to read or began reading their novel silently.

3. Show and Tell/X-Raying a Book. See more at the end of this post.

HW: HW: Finish reading approximately 1/4 of your novel by Friday. If you’re going to be gone on the band field trip you should read approximately 1/2 by Tuesday. Take your X-ray notes as you read!

***

Every book has a skeleton hidden between its covers. Your job as an analytical reader is to find it.

A book comes to you with flesh on its bare bones and clothes over its flesh. It is all dressed up. You do not have to undress it or tear the flesh off its limbs to get at the firm structure that underlies the soft surface. But you must read the book with X-ray eyes, for it is an essential part of your apprehension of any book to grasp its structure.

Adler, Mortimer and Van Doren, Charles. How to Read a Book. New York: MJF Book, 1972. Print. p. 75

Read this wonderful, short essay by Mortimer Adler for more information on marking your book. I showed students a variety of examples of how to make notes on a book and today students decided what works best for them. Students must make notes on their books in some form, either in the book itself or on a separate sheet of paper, Google Document, or notebook.

Everyone must keep a chapter outline, where you write an extremely brief summary of each chapter. Here are some of mine:

IMG_1477

My outline for current favorite book _Tender Is the Night_

IMG_1478

My outline for _Great Expectations_, which I’m reading for the first time as an adult now.

You could also . . .

  • draw a map of the story
  • make a family tree
  • list characters
  • draw characters
  • create a timeline
  • write down words you don’t know
  • anything else that might help you

Yes, it’s true — there is no one way to do this! As you continue reading, you will develop your own methods and habits that will help you in college and beyond.

Here are some more examples:

IMG_1479

My drawings, timeline, and chapter summaries for _Great Expectations_

IMG_1480

A family tree for _Great Expectations_

IMG_1481

A set of symbols you might use to mark motifs in your margins.

Author and professor Vladimir Nabokov’s map of the novel _Ulysseys_

Vladimir Nabokov’s drawings in _The Metamorphosis_

Here are some students X-Raying in 4A:

IMG_1475 IMG_1476