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January 28: B Day January 28, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Outlining an Essay.

1. Students added one more quote to their idea charts.

2. Students received their group thesis statement back with some revisions.

3. As a group, we looked at W8: Basic Essay Outline. Then, groups worked on coming up with common topic sentences to support their thesis. This took the majority of class.

HW: Write an ACE-IT paragraph proving the topic sentence assigned to you off of W8. You must use one piece of evidence from the novel. Have too much to say for one paragraph? No problem! Make it two paragraphs!

Turn this paragraph in to the box on Friday morning (since there’s no school on Wednesday, Friday will be the next B day).

Struggling? Here’s a fill-in-the-blank version to help you out: tkam motif fill in the blank and ACEIT completed notes

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January 27: A Day January 27, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Outlining an Essay.

1. Students added one more quote to their idea charts.

2. Students received their group thesis statement back with some revisions.

3. As a group, we looked at W8: Basic Essay Outline. Then, groups worked on coming up with common topic sentences to support their thesis. This took the majority of class.

HW: Write an ACE-IT paragraph proving the topic sentence assigned to you off of W8. You must use one piece of evidence from the novel. Have too much to say for one paragraph? No problem! Make it two paragraphs!

Turn this paragraph in to the box on Wednesday morning.

Struggling? Here’s a fill-in-the-blank version to help you out: tkam motif fill in the blank

January 24: B Day January 24, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Today was just incredible, chock-full of brilliant ideas from earnest minds.

Students will begin a big project, the Mockingbird Collaborative Essay Assignment. This is a group essay written paragraph by paragraph. Instead of students having to respond to teacher-written prompts, which are boring at best and impossible to answer at worst, students will devise their own essay topics. This is a key skill in upper-level English classes and in college! Also, it makes the essay more interesting to write because you have say over what you’re writing about. So today we learned how to select a topic.

1. First, we went through this sheet: Writing a Thesis Statement Mockingbird (W7)

2. Then, Ms. Garvoille demonstrated how to think on the spot, turning a question into a thesis statement. She made her own idea chart in front of the class.

3. Next, students worked on their own idea charts to gather their evidence, ideas, etc.

4. We then took a little break for some notes on thesis statements. Here are the notes: Thesis Statements

Here’s what to fill in:

What is it? A statement of a position you will prove to be true

Why do I need one? It tells your reader where your essay is going

How long is it? Usually one sentence, up to three sentences [You should only use more than one sentence if you are a very confident writer or if your topic is very complex.]

Where does it go? The last sentence(s) of your introduction before your first body paragraph.

When do you use it? Persuasive essays, i.e. all History and English essays

A good thesis statement has the strength of DADS:

Debatable: Can you have an argument about it?

Analytical: Is it relevant to the field (i.e. English or The Outsiders studies) or is it your random opinion? [Example of your random opinion: If Jem were a historical figure, he would be Abraham Lincoln. This is random and unrelated.]

Defensible: Can you prove it? Is there evidence?

Specific: Does it answer the questions how and why?

HW: None

January 23: A Day January 23, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Today was all about thesis statements! Students will begin a big project, the Mockingbird Collaborative Essay Assignment. This is a group essay written paragraph by paragraph. Instead of students having to respond to teacher-written prompts, which are boring at best and impossible to answer at worst, students will devise their own essay topics. This is a key skill in upper-level English classes and in college! Also, it makes the essay more interesting to write because you have say over what you’re writing about. So today we learned how to select a topic.

First, we went through this sheet: Writing a Thesis Statement Mockingbird (W7)

In 4A we took notes on thesis statements, but we didn’t get to it in 1A. We’ll do that next time. Here are the notes: Thesis Statements

Here are the notes to fill in:

What is it? A statement of a position you will prove to be true

Why do I need one? It tells your reader where your essay is going

How long is it? Usually one sentence, up to three sentences [You should only use more than one sentence if you are a very confident writer or if your topic is very complex.]

Where does it go? The last sentence(s) of your introduction before your first body paragraph.

When do you use it? Persuasive essays, i.e. all History and English essays

A good thesis statement has the strength of DADS:

Debatable: Can you have an argument about it?

Analytical: Is it relevant to the field (i.e. English or The Outsiders studies) or is it your random opinion? [Example of your random opinion: If Jem were a historical figure, he would be Abraham Lincoln. This is random and unrelated.]

Defensible: Can you prove it? Is there evidence?

Specific: Does it answer the questions how and why?

HW: None

January 22: B Day January 22, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1. Charades. In order to focus students on using the text during the seminar discussion, we played a few rounds of charades in which students drew quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird to act out.

2. Favorite lines. Next, students found one line from “The Courthouse Ring” to share with the class.

3. Freewrite. Just before our discussion started, all students wrote to the question: Are some lives more valuable than others? What determines that value.

4. Seminar discussion. We discussed the freewrite question as well as the question of whether or not Atticus did enough in Mockingbird (this is the question Gladwell poses in his article) and whether the novel encourages readers to believe that some lives are, in fact, not valuable. As we discussed, students participated via a backchannel and took notes here: Seminar notes mockingbird.

5. Closing question. Students wrote the answer to one of the following questions: What do you want to remember from this discussion? Did Bob Ewell deserve to die? Is Atticus a true hero or not?

HW: NONE!

January 17: A Day January 18, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1. Charades. In order to focus students on using the text during the seminar discussion, we played a few rounds of charades in which students drew quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird to act out.

2. Favorite lines. Next, students found one line from “The Courthouse Ring” to share with the class.

3. Freewrite. Just before our discussion started, all students wrote to the question: Are some lives more valuable than others? What determines that value.

4. Seminar discussion. We discussed the freewrite question as well as the question of whether or not Atticus did enough in Mockingbird (this is the question Gladwell poses in his article) and whether the novel encourages readers to believe that some lives are, in fact, not valuable. As we discussed, students participated via a backchannel and took notes here: Seminar notes mockingbird.

5. Closing question. Students wrote the answer to one of the following questions: What do you want to remember from this discussion? Did Bob Ewell deserve to die? Is Atticus a true hero or not?

HW: NONE!

January 15 and 16: A and B Day January 15, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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Today students took the district CA exam! Woo!

HW: Read “The Courthouse Ring.” Friday, we will have a whole-class seminar discussion. To focus our conversation, we will be reading and annotating the article “The Courthouse Ring” by Malcolm Gladwell. Here’s the link if you’re interested or if you were absent: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/08/10/090810fa_fact_gladwell (Honors version)

Adapted version: The Courthouse Ring Modified for ESL and The Courthouse Ring Standard

January 14: B Day January 14, 2014

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1. Reflection on Motif Journal. Today all A day students turned in their motif journals, which counts as a project grade. We wrote answers to these reflection questions during class:

  1. How did completing the motif journal as you read alter your reading experience?
  2. What kind of creative entry did you most enjoy?
  3. What grade do you think you deserve and why?

2. Oral quiz on Chapters 28-31.

3. Connections between To Kill a Mockingbird and Jesus Huerta. We watched a short news clip, then wrote about and discussed possible ties between Durham teen Huerta and the novel.

4. Found poem. Students created a blackout poem using one of the last pages of the novel. The assignment was to communicate one theme of the novel through your poem.

HW: Read “The Courthouse Ring.” Next Wednesday, we will have a whole-class seminar discussion. To focus our conversation, we will be reading and annotating the article “The Courthouse Ring” by Malcolm Gladwell. Here’s the link if you’re interested or if you were absent: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/08/10/090810fa_fact_gladwell (Honors version)

Adapted version: The Courthouse Ring Modified for ESL and The Courthouse Ring Standard

January 13: A Day January 13, 2014

Posted by garvoille in Uncategorized.
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1. Reflection on Motif Journal. Today all A day students turned in their motif journals, which counts as a project grade. We wrote answers to these reflection questions during class:

  1. How did completing the motif journal as you read alter your reading experience?
  2. What kind of creative entry did you most enjoy?
  3. What grade do you think you deserve and why?

2. Connections between To Kill a Mockingbird and Jesus Huerta. We watched a short news clip, then wrote about and discussed possible ties between Durham teen Huerta and the novel.

3. Oral quiz on Chapters 28-31.

4. Reading time on “The Courthouse Ring.” Friday, we will have a whole-class seminar discussion. To focus our conversation, we will be reading the article “The Courthouse Ring” by Malcolm Gladwell. Students began reading and annotating the article in class. Here’s the link if you’re interested or if you were absent: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/08/10/090810fa_fact_gladwell (Honors version)

Adapted version: The Courthouse Ring Modified for ESL and The Courthouse Ring Standard

HW: Read and annotate “The Courthouse Ring” by Friday. Bring to class along with your book.

January 9 and 10: A and B day January 10, 2014

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1. A Day only: Students started by writing an ACE-IT paragraph on the passage we annotated in class about the empty gun. They will get back this paragraph with comments for revision on Monday.

A and B day: Students reviewed for the oral quiz on Chapter 24-27.

2. We discussed the chapters through an oral quiz. The final oral quiz will be on Monday/Tuesday. This is your last chance to get credit for reading this quarter!

3. Motif group meetings. Students met with their motif groups to fill out a card with a passage related to their motif or a question, contradiction, or theory about their motif. These may turn into essay topics.

4. B Day only: Read-aloud. I read to students the first part of Chapter 28 to get them hooked for the weekend. It was delightful!

HW:

All – read chapters 28-31 (aka the rest of the book) for Monday/Tuesday. Complete your motif journal (directions here:TKAM Motif Journal Instructions) and TURN IT INTO THE HOMEWORK BOX by Monday/Tuesday. Honors you should have 10 entries. Standard, you should have 8 entries.

Other Voices, Other Rooms: Finish reading the novel by Monday/Tuesday.