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Theater

This musical version (though in French) covers many scenes from Romeo and Juliet:

I.i: Street Brawl

“La Haine” from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001).

This song is specifically about the lines spoken by Lady Capulet (“A crutch! A crutch! Why call you for a sword?”) and Lady Montague (“Thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe”).

I.iii: Juliet, Nurse, and Lady Capulet discuss Juliet’s potential marriage to Paris

“Tu Dois Te Marier” (“You Must Marry”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001).

I.v.16f: Ball Scene: Romeo and Juliet first meet

“L’Amour Heureux” (“Happy Love”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001).

II.ii.61f Balcony Scene: Romeo courts Juliet

“Tonight” composed by Leonard Bernstein from West Side Story (film, 1961, dir. Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins), starring Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer.

“Le Balcon”  (“The Balcony”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001). This song also includes Juliet musing on Romeo’s name. It basically compresses the entire of II.ii into one song.

Act II, scene ii performed by The Royal Shakespeare Company  in the summer of 2011.

II.vi: The secret marriage of Romeo and Juliet

“Aimer”  (“To Love”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001).

III.i.34-133: Tybalt kills Mercutio; Romeo kills Tybalt

“Le Duel” (“The Duel”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001).

III.v.1-59: Romeo and Juliet’s farewell after their first night together; their last living kiss.

“Le Chant de l’Allouette” (“The Song of the Lark”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001).

IV.i.44f: Friar Laurence gives Juliet the sleeping potion

“Le Poison” (“The Poison”) from the musical Romeo et Juliette: de la Haine à l’Amour (Romeo and Juliet: From Hate to Love) composed and written by Gérard Presgurvic (2001). This is a combination of this scene and the scene when Juliet considers taking the potion.

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